Saturday, May 28, 2016

DANNERS, FED WRECK & BIG OIL CONNECTION

Originally Published At CNHAExposed.org In 2003

Natives, Senators and Oil
 - The Connection Between Drilling In The
 Arctic National Wildlife Refuge And The Akaka Bill.

By Anne Keala Kelly

 The Conclusion -

A request for an interview with Jade Danner yielded a phone call asking to have questions emailed to her. Question: Are you or have you ever been a paid lobbyist for Arctic Power or any Alaska corporation, specifically with interests in oil development? Answer: "I've never been a 'lobbyist,' paid or unpaid, for Arctic Power or any other Alaska corporation with an interest in oil development. Two years ago, I was contracted by Arctic Power for six weeks to assist the Inupiat people in their efforts to set the record straight and educate the Hawaii public about their position in the ANWR debate…." 


Less than two years ago, in March 2002, Jade Danner wrote a letter to the editor of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, in response to an op-ed written by Charles Burrows. Burrows, a retired Kamehameha Schools teacher and President of Ahahui Malama I ka Lokahi, a cultural/environmental group on Oahu, criticized Senator Akaka's support for drilling in the Refuge. Akaka has been asked repeatedly about his position on drilling since his visit to Alaska to meet with the Inupiat Eskimoes in 1995, a trip that he credits with changing his vote in favor of drilling. Burrows and others have publicly asked the senator why he hasn't taken the time to visit the Gwich'in to hear their side of the issue, a question that has consistently gone unanswered.


Jade Danner's criticism of Burrows' editorial invoked the kind of rhetoric that confuses native politics with oil politics, lauding Senator Akaka's support for the Inupiat as support for native "self-determination." Public records indicate, however, that she was being paid for writing such letters as part of a contractual agreement with Arctic Power.


State of Alaska public records include a copy of an Arctic Power contract signed by Jade Danner on 2/15/02, with no date of termination. It is an agreement to pay Danner and Associates "A flat monthly fee of $5000 for services." Included in the "Scope of Work" section of the contract is: "Development of a Strategic Plan in conjunction with Arctic Power for Hawaii; Monitor and respond to opposing editorials/stories in local news media; Provide periodic updates to Arctic Power about activities and progress in Hawaii; Communicate with Hawaii's Senators' staff to determine how to be most effective in assisting with educating the Hawaiian populace about the facts of ANWR; other projects as may be assigned by Arctic Power," and more.


Staff members from the offices of both Senators Inouye and Akaka say they have no knowledge of Jade Danner being paid to represent drilling in the Refuge. Paul Cardus, Senator Akaka's press secretary said, "No one was aware of her role as a lobbyist, no one met with her to discuss ANWR." He continued, "Jade Danner never met with or spoke to the Senator." 


Yet, payment from Arctic Power to Danner and Associates, for deflecting criticism from within the Hawaiian community about Senator Akaka's support for drilling, suggests that the senator's staff is aware of the business arrangement between Danner and Associates and the Alaska oil industry, via Arctic Power.


A Danner & Associates ANWR Activity Log lists eight activities undertaken on behalf of Arctic Power. Number seven reads: ". . .Worked to defeat local attempts to use Hawaiian forums as an avenue to pass resolutions opposing Senator Akaka's position on ANWR. Provide appropriate follow-up in communicating action to Senator Akaka's office." One such "Hawaiian forum" was the November 2002 Hawaiian Civic Club Convention, wherein Robin Danner successfully argued against a resolution to support the subsistence rights of the Gwich'in people. She also used the lexicon of native sovereignty struggle, telling the attendees that the matter of drilling in the Refuge is a matter of self-determination for the Inupiat. 


With regard to Robin Danner's connection to Arctic Power, when asked if she has ever been financially compensated for efforts done by her on behalf of drilling in the Refuge, through her position as CEO of the Council, she responded, "The answer is clearly no, I have not done any lobbying through CNHA." But in her position with the Council, she billed Arctic Power directly, using a Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement reimbursement request form, for her own travel expenses to attend a Teamster's Convention in Honolulu. Using such a form suggests Arctic Power is well aware of her position at the Council and apparently willing to accept a request for payment with the Council's letterhead on it.


If any of that money was reimbursed directly to the Council, that means Alaska oil lobbying money went into the Council's bank account. If the travel expenses were not reimbursed to the Council, then Robin Danner used Council money to represent Arctic Power at the Teamsters Convention. 


When asked about this, she explained the Council's reimbursement form as a matter of reverse invoicing for airline coupons, saying that they were "used to attend a regional conference of the Teamsters . . . I was invited to speak at their conference, accepted and did so. Jade did not attend, she did not accompany me, she was not invited." 


The Danner and Associates ANWR Activity Log contradicts this and her earlier comment about never having done work for Danner and Associates. Among the activities on the log are: "Prepare and deliver speech to the Teamsters with Presentation of Bowhead Ear Drum to Senator Daniel Akaka… Provide appropriate feedback to Senator Akaka's Office and Arctic Power." The activity log, along with the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement request for travel reimbursement that was signed by Robin Danner on 2/27/02, became part of a $7500 Danner and Associates invoice submitted to Arctic Power in March of 2002, and eventually made its way into Alaska's public records. 


Beyond the uncertainties of Hawaiian political identity there remain questions about power and political process. If Alaska's oil industry can reach into the Hawaiian community and make its will known, what other influence does it have in determining the future of the Hawaiian people? 
As it stands, two politically powerful Hawaiians, with ties to Alaska oil money and two U.S. Senators, have garnered tremendous support for the Hawaiian Federal Recognition Bill and inspired a dearth of support for the Gwich'in and their efforts to keep drilling out of the Refuge. Their economic dealings shine an embarrassing light on the political relationship between the Hawaiian people and Hawaii's Congressional delegation, and chilling similarities between Hawaiians and Alaska Natives. 


If Federal Recognition can lead to Hawaiians relinquishing claims to any part of Hawai'i, they could end up in a situation like that between the Inupiat and the Gwich'in: corporate natives versus cultural natives. Right now, the acreage of Hawaiian Homestead land, which is part of the nearly 2 million acres of "Crown and Government land" renamed "ceded lands" when the United States took control, is virtually the same amount of land the Alaska Natives ended up with after their settlement: just 10% of what was once all theirs.

 

Friday, May 27, 2016

DANNERS, FED WRECK & BIG OIL CONNECTION

Originally Published At CNHAExposed.org In 2003

Natives, Senators and Oil
 - The Connection Between Drilling In The
 Arctic National Wildlife Refuge And The Akaka Bill.

By Anne Keala Kelly

Part Two -

The Alaska Connection


In July of 2001, more than a year before the Council hosted its first convention for Hawaiians, it held the "1st Annual Native Hawaiian-Alaska Native Summit," funded by major Hawai'i banks that hold hundreds of millions of Hawaiian trust dollars. Bank of Hawai'i, First Hawaiian Bank, American Savings Bank and others put up the money for an invitation-only gathering with the stated purpose of discussing management of native trusts, foundations and service agencies. The CEO of the Council, Robin Danner, had proven her ability to gain the cooperation of influential politicians and financial institutions in a very short time, pulling together some of the most distinguished members of Congress from both sides of the aisle. 


Keynote speakers included Senators Inouye and Akaka; other speakers were then Senator, now Governor of Alaska, Frank Murkowski, Representatives Patsy Mink and Neil Abercrombie, Alaska Representative Don Young, and a videotaped message from Alaska Senator Ted Stevens. Senator Stevens, who as pro tempore is third in line to the presidency of the United States, has put his name to the Hawaiian Federal Recognition Bill, which was re-dubbed the Akaka-Stevens Bill in June of this year. 


Although Hawaiians are not organized into villages and corporations like the 138 Alaska Native villages and 13 Alaska Native Corporations that comprise the Alaska Federation of Natives, the network of Hawaiian nonprofits now in the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement could be said to be a close imitation. But the Council is either intentionally or unwittingly also mimicking the federation's interest in Alaskan oil money and federal control.

The Gwich'in, 
The Inupiat, The Oil



Inupiat-owned Arctic Slope Regional Corporation owns five million acres of land, including the Alpine oil field, which is the 10th largest-producing oil field in America. A map of the North Slope shows that millions of acres surrounding the Refuge are dotted by oil-producing fields.
Thus far, all drilling has taken place outside of the 5% of the Arctic Coastal Plain known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, which is where the Porcupine Caribou birthing grounds, sacred to the Gwich'in people, are located. It's estimated that the oil inside the Refuge will take 10 years to deliver and is only enough to sustain U.S. oil consumption for 6 months.


So, why are the state of Alaska, Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, and multi-national oil corporations lobbying the Congress to grant access for drilling the Refuge? And how did drilling inside a national "Refuge" ever become an option?



Settling Native Claims


The 1971 Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, referred to as ANCSA, is considered by many organizations of indigenous peoples in and outside of the U.S. to be the worst native settlement in modern times. It is also one of the most amended Congressional Acts in the history of the United States. When oil corporations and the State of Alaska realized the substantial wealth and jobs that could be generated from drilling in Prudhoe Bay and the surrounding area, the push was on for a claims settlement. Throughout Alaska, in exchange for extinguishing native title to 90% of their lands, tribes were given what amounted to less than $3 per acre.


In the face of the less-than-generous terms of ANCSA, the Inupiat Eskimos are among a few tribes that have been financially successful strategists. They formed the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, and it has paid off. With a rate of growth ahead of the S&P 500 index, last year's revenues through oil and other subsidiaries were about $1.5 billion. Among their many subsidiary corporations is one that maintains a contract with the U.S. to supply fuel to the military, another that provides support services for U.S. military radar systems, a company that operates a plastics manufacturer in Guadalajara, and an office in Venezuela that analyzes that country's oil industry. 
But ANCSA was not attractive to all of Alaska's Native tribes, and some communities were split; there were no hearings or votes taken at the villages. Of the 8 Gwich'in villages on the U.S. side of the border, 2 villages opted out of ANCSA and maintained a traditional subsistence life and title to their lands. Like many Federally Recognized tribes, the Gwich'in have a tenuous relationship with the U.S. government.


The Inupiat, on the other hand, have a corporate relationship with the state and federal government. In 1983, Department of Interior Secretary James Watt signed a controversial land exchange with the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation that brought the total acreage of the corporation's contingent subsurface rights in the coastal plain of the Refuge to 92,000. 
In spite of the stipulation prohibiting development (unless Congress opens the Refuge) the corporation has already made $39 million from speculative lease agreements with Chevron, Texaco, and British Petroleum. In fact, within five years of the 1983 land exchange, efforts were begun in earnest to open the Refuge to drilling. But the Gwich'in people, who live on the south and east border of the Refuge, have put up resistance to every proposal put before Congress and have maintained a grassroots struggle because of the threat to the Porcupine Caribou.
The Inupiat, who own the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation, are a coastal people who rely mainly on marine life for their traditional foods; the Porcupine Caribou account for about 10 percent of their diet. But for the Gwich'in, who strategically established their villages along the migratory paths of the Porcupine Caribou herd during the past several thousand years, the caribou are 70 percent of their food. Faith Gemmill, spokesperson for the Gwich'in, said, "The caribou are our family. We made a commitment to protect the caribou and our way of life, and if we are not successful we will perish, too."


Other animals that birth and den in the Refuge include grizzly bears, polar bears, and many different species of birds.

The Hawaiian Connection


Before anything can be done to settle Hawaiian claims, it appears that Hawaiians must accept the moniker of being a federally recognized tribe to insure the plenary powers of the U.S. Congress over them as a people. One section of the Akaka Bill allows for a "Hawaiian governing entity" to enter into negotiations with the federal government to settle Native Hawaiian land claims, as was done to/with the Alaska Natives. Plans for a settlement are already being put forth by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, who together with another state agency, Department of Hawaiian Homelands and the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement appear eager to set themselves up as representatives of the Hawaiian people. But the Council has the power at this point because they can lobby for the legislation freely. Whereas, despite the numerous trips Office of Hawaiian Affairs trustees have made to D.C. to lobby for the bill, state agencies must at least appear to represent the interests of all residents of Hawai'i. 


The motivation for financial support from the Inupiat-owned Arctic Slope Regional Corporation to the Council, though, has come into focus due to a business arrangement between a company called Danner and Associates and an Alaska non-profit group called Arctic Power. Arctic Power is funded by the state of Alaska, oil industry corporations, including Exxon Mobil, and unions with interests in Alaska's oil industry, including the Teamsters. The relationship between Danner and Associates and Arctic Power dates back at least to February 2002. 


When asked about her role in Danner and Associates, Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement CEO, Robin Danner, described it as one of several Danner family initiatives. She then declined a telephone or in-person interview, and stated in an email: "I don't have an ownership interest in it [Danner and Associates], I don't manage it, I've never been paid by it, I've never done any work for it - I can't really tell you much more than that." 


The Conclusion Tomorrow...

Thursday, May 26, 2016

DANNERS, FED WRECK & BIG OIL CONNECTION

Originally Published At CNHAExposed.org In 2003

Natives, Senators and Oil
 - The Connection Between Drilling In The
 Arctic National Wildlife Refuge And The Akaka Bill.

By Anne Keala Kelly

Part One -

Hours before the war in Iraq officially began on March 19th, the Boxer Amendment stripped a provision from the budget bill that would have allowed drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Had the President announced the beginning of the war sooner, it's unlikely the amendment would have succeeded. Now, as debates about the value of oil intensify, it will become increasingly difficult to keep drilling out of the Refuge. After all, how can we justify risking American lives in the Middle East to secure that region's oil reserves without being willing to drill the wells dry in our own back yard? 


This story is about that untapped oil at the top of the world and the surprising connection between it and the Hawaiian Federal Recognition bill, referred to as the Akaka Bill. It's a peek behind the curtain of how the politics of oil can corrupt the politics of native peoples. It shows how the Alaska oil industry has stepped into the Native Hawaiian community to secure Senator Daniel Akaka's support for drilling in the Refuge, and to convince Hawaiians to oppose the Gwich'in people. 


The Gwich'in are an Alaska Native tribe fighting to keep the oil industry out of the Refuge. As a federally recognized tribe, the Gwich'in are subject to the plenary powers of Congress, which means Congress has absolute power to make determinations that directly impact their environment and food source. The United States' classification of Hawaiians and how that would affect their political future is part of the debate over the Akaka Bill, which seeks to define them, like the Gwich'in, as federally recognized "Native Americans." Among Hawaiians who oppose the bill, such a definition is viewed as an attempt to extinguish the dual political status Hawaiians have as indigenous people and citizens of an occupied, independent Nation State that was illegally annexed by the US in 1898. 


Connections between what is happening with the Gwich'in people, and what may happen with Hawaiians should they choose to go the way of federal recognition, don't end with the plenary powers of Congress or Senator Akaka's vote on drilling. Hawaiians and Gwich'in actually have another critical link in common - that being how Alaska's oil industry has, via the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement, influenced Hawaiian politics on the issue of the Akaka Bill. The answer to why this connects the Gwich'in struggle to keep drilling out of the Refuge with Hawaiian debates over the Akaka Bill, is discovered by examining who has power over federal dollars for Hawaiians and who is pressuring them to accept federal recognition.

Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement

Three years ago, the Council for Native Hawaiian Advancement was organized to help non-profits that provide Hawaiian healthcare, housing, education and cultural programs apply for or keep federal funding. Robin Danner, a Native Hawaiian who, at 36, moved home to Kauai a little more than 4 years ago and led the way to assemble the Council, becoming its first President and CEO. After living 25 years in Alaska with her parents, and brothers and sisters, she brought a working knowledge of how Alaska natives have navigated the path to native corporate and non-profit federal contracts. 


Once established, the Council quickly came to include nonprofit powerhouses who handle most of the millions of federal dollars earmarked for Native Hawaiians. It also includes CEOs and trustees from Native Hawaiian trusts like the Queen Lili'uokalani Trust, which has a modest portfolio that benefits Hawaiian orphans, and the billion-dollar Bishop Estates Trust, now called Kamehameha Schools. Since its inception, the Council has become part of the status quo, serving as facilitator of the prestigious Administrative Native American federal contract, which is worth $1.2 million, and directed by Robin's younger sister, Jade Danner. The Council has also received a pledge of $100,000 from Bank of Hawai'i, and other institutional support, including $100,000 from the Inupiat-owned Arctic Slope Regional Corporation.


 The need for an organization like the Council became apparent in the wake of the US Supreme Court's 2000 decision in Rice vs. Cayetano, allowing non-Hawaiians to elect trustees to the state agency, Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Since then, funding and tax breaks given to Hawaiian non-profits and trusts have come under legal attack as unlawful, race-based benefits. (See "Rice on Rice," page 17 of this issue of HIJ). 


Lesser- known, less well-connected Hawaiian non-profits looking for funding have joined or considered joining the Council, hoping to team up with other non-profits. But what has apparently emerged as the Council's most pressing concern is not what most Hawaiian non-profit organizers were expecting. In September 2002, the Council's 1st Annual Native Hawaiian Conference took place at the Sheraton Waikiki. With a personal visit from Senator Daniel Akaka and videotaped messages from the Hawai'i Congressional delegation that were shown daily, the gathering took the shape of a well-financed sales pitch and rallying cry for the Akaka Bill. 
The Council held its second gathering in Waikiki in August 2003. This time the congressional giant himself, Senator Daniel Inouye, addressed several hundred Hawaiians in person, assuring them that there now exists a "rare demonstration of unity" between Hawai'i state, local, and federal lawmakers on the matter of federal recognition. Inouye then went on to urge Hawaiians to do the same and unite behind this bill.

Part Two Tomorrow...



Wednesday, May 25, 2016

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"WHO IN THE WORLD IS PUEO?"

Not All Hawaiians Oppose The Construction Of The Mauna Kea Telescope.

Who Is This New Pueo Group?

Why Are They Now Supporting Construction Of TMT?

Watch This To Discover Their Shocking Reason For Supporting It & Who They Might Be Connected To.


Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.



Tuesday, May 24, 2016

TELL THE DOI "NO!" TO FED WRECK
























It Takes Just A Minute
Submit Your Letter Of Opposition - AinaLahui.com

Monday, May 23, 2016

BECOME A FAN OF "VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`I'S FUTURE" ON FACEBOOK


See Behind The Scenes Shots Of Our Shows


 






















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Sunday, May 22, 2016

RESPONSIBILITY ABILITY ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Kuleana - A Visit With Mana Caceres"

What would you do if you discovered you were responsible for fifteen generations of your relatives? Kuleana is the Hawaiian word meaning “area of responsibility.” So what does that have to do with popular Hawaiian music recording artist Mana Caceres? Join us in our visit with one of Hawai`iʻs hottest musical talents and find out what he discovered and how it changed his life forever - Watch It Here

MONDAY, May 23rd At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 53 
MONDAY, May 23rd At 7:00 PM & FRIDAY, May 27th At 5:30 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  
TUESDAY, May 24th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, May 26th At 7:30 PM  & SATURDAY, May 28th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52
SATURDAY, May 28th At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
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Saturday, May 21, 2016

WOW! - LOOK AT THIS!
DANNER EVICTION DIRTY LAUNDRY

Look At What Jade Says About Her Sister Robin
Robin Danner Is Plaintiff - Jade Danner Is Defendant


































































See All The Danner Eviction Court Documents Here - TinyURL.com/DannerDirtyLaundry

Friday, May 20, 2016

HAWAIIANS DELIVER STRONG OPPOSITION TO U.S. PUSH TO CREATE HAWAI`I TRIBAL NATION

Week Of Washington, DC Meetings & Events Seen As Success

(WASHINGTON, DC) - Hawaiians from Hawai`i have spent this week meeting with U.S. federal officials to oppose a longstanding plan to put Hawaiians into tribal nation status, much like American Indians.

Opposition to stopping this effort came to a head recently when it was discovered that President Obama is considering issuing an executive directive before leaving office early next year ordering the US Department of Interior (DOI) to federally recognize Native Hawaiians as a tribal nation against their wishes.

Having failed for 12 years to get the U.S. Congress to fabricate a fake Hawaiian tribal nation through the Akaka Bill, the State of Hawai`i has now clumsily attempted to concoct one by handing over a ready-made one for the Department of the Interior to take into the fold of recognized American Indian tribes.

However, today most native Hawaiians are adamantly refusing to be stuck into a fake tribal nation.

The U.S. government wants to do it anyway, whether Hawaiians like it or not, and whether anyone else living in Hawai`i likes it or not.

“This is why weʻve spent this week in Washington, DC, stated Hawaiian Kingdom Foreign Minister Leon Siu.

“We wanted to deliver a resounding ʻNO!ʻ to the Obama administration regarding their federal recognition scheme and we have done just that.”

Since there never was a treaty of annexation, Hawai`i never legally became part of the U.S. according to U.S. laws and constitution.

To duck this problem, the Obama administration has had designs to put Hawaiians into a tribal nation like American Indians.

This way Hawaiiansʻ claims to their lands can be put into a kind of Native Hawaiian land pool under a tribal “governing entity” recognized and administered by the DOI, similar to lands of the American Indians and Native Alaskans.

What has emerged, however, is so sloppy, so distasteful, so repulsive to Hawaiians and Americans, it will be extremely difficult for the Obama administration and the DOI to succeed.

Thursday, May 19, 2016

FALLOUT CONTINUES FROM DANNER EVICTION REVELATION

Hawaiian Homestead Communities Outraged By Actions Of Robin Danner

(HONOLULU, HAWAI`I) - Outrage, anger and disbelief are the main reactions of Hawaiians who live on homestead land to a bombshell report that began airing online yesterday on Free Hawai`i TV.

The report, aired on the Koani Foundationʻs Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network at http://FreeHawaiiTV.com, revealed that Sovereign Councils Of Hawaiian Homelands Assembly (SCHHA) chairperson Robin Danner evicted her own sister, Jade Danner Jones and her family earlier this year from a Waimanalo, O`ahu Hawaiian homestead property for non payment of rent.

The home in question is leased by Robin Danner from the Department of Hawaiian Homelands (DHHL.)

Free Hawai`i TV obtained copies of court documents of the eviction and has posted them online here - http://TinyURL.com/DannerEviction

“Response has been both immediate and intense,” reports Free Hawai`i TV host `Ehu Kekahu Cardwell. “People are outraged and want answers.”

“Isnʻt there a rule in place that a person can receive only one residential homestead?” is a question that many have asked.

“If Robin has a Waimanalo, O`ahu homestead in her name, and yet she lives on an Anahola, Kaua`i homestead, whose name is on the Anahola homestead lease? There is something highly wrong with this womanʻs apparent control of so much DHHL property,” is sentiment expressed by many.

“This is who is in Washington, DC this week claiming to speak for Hawaiians?” asked another homesteader.

“These kind of people would sell out our keikiʻs birthright and future for a few crumbs from the U.S. angrily stated a Hawaiian National.

Since being posted online this yesterday, the Free Hawai`i TV video report continues to evoke outrage and anger amongst many throughout social media sites online.

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"FLASH - ROBIN DANNER EVICTS HER OWN SISTER"

What Kind Of A Person Would Evict Their Own Sister From Hawaiian Homestead Land?

Thatʻs What Robin Danner Did Earlier This Year To Her Sister Jade.

Who Would Robin Evict If She Was Head Of A US Federally Recognized Hawaiian Tribe? Could You Trust Her Not To Evict You?

Watch This For Our Bombshell Report & See The Actual Court Documents For Yourself.


Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.



Tuesday, May 17, 2016

U.S. DEPT OF INTERIOR TRYING TO FORCE HAWAIIANS INTO INDIAN TRIBE

Dept. Of Interior Move Would Mask Prolonged Illegal Occupation

(WASHINGTON, DC) - Hawaiians from Hawai`i and elsewhere are converging on Washington, DC this week to strongly protest and meet with key U.S. officials and decision makers. Why?

Hawaiians are alarmed because there are a series of meetings taking place this week in Washington, DC that focus on the possibility the U.S. Department Of Interior (DOI) is trying to turn Hawaiians into a U.S. Indian tribe.

The U.S. has a big problem that it apparently thinks can be solved by putting Hawaiians into a concocted Indian tribe.

“This is a desperate attempt to tie up loose ends from the illegal takeover of Hawai`i 118 years ago,” remarked Hawaiian Kingdom Foreign Minister Leon Siu.

“The U.S. doesn’t actually have legal title to lands in Hawai`i, so the U.S. thinks it can solve this problem by tricking the Hawaiian people into signing over their claim by identifying themselves as indigenous to the United States.

“Before too many Hawaiians find out about it and claim lands that are rightfully theirs, the U.S. is trying to get Hawaiians to pool their land interests into a tribal nation that the U.S. can “recognize” as a nation within a nation - a subservient Hawaiian nation within a superior U.S. nation, and therefore regain control.

“And thatʻs why weʻre here in Washington, Dc this week to say ʻNo!ʻ to this slight of hand.”

The U.S. takeover of the Hawaiian Islands in 1898 was an unlawful act which the U.S. has since officially admitted and apologized for. (See U.S. law 103-150 signed by President Bill Clinton.)

Jurisdiction and title to lands of the Hawaiian Kingdom were never lawfully conveyed to the U.S.

The U.S. simply used its bully power at the close of the nineteenth century to assume “ownership” of Hawaiian lands, ignoring the rightful claims of the Hawaiian Kingdom and the Hawaiian people.

Despite a century of propaganda and indoctrination the people have awakened to the fact that the U.S. and its puppet government, the fake State of Hawai`i not only have no jurisdiction, they own no land.

Monday, May 16, 2016

HAWAIIANS OPPOSE U.S. PUSH TO CREATE HAWAI`I TRIBAL NATION

U.S. Dept. Of Interior Move Would Mask Prolonged Illegal Occupation

(WASHINGTON, DC) - Hawaiians from Hawai`i are meeting with U.S. federal officials this week to oppose a longstanding plan to put Hawaiians into tribal nation status, much like American Indians.

Opposition to stopping this effort came to a head recently when it was discovered that President Obama is considering issuing an executive directive before leaving office early next year ordering the US Department of Interior (DOI) to federally recognize Native Hawaiians as a tribal nation against their wishes.

Since there never was a treaty of annexation, Hawai`i never legally became part of the U.S. according to U.S. laws and constitution.

To duck this problem, the Obama administration hopes to put Hawaiians into a tribal nation like American Indians.

This way Hawaiiansʻ claims to their lands can be put into a kind of Native Hawaiian land pool under a tribal “governing entity” recognized and administered by the DOI, similar to lands of the American Indians and Native Alaskans.

“The U.S. has a big problem. It doesn’t have title to lands in Hawai`i,” states Hawaiian Kingdom Foreign Minister Leon Siu.

“When the U.S. wrongfully took over Hawai`i more than a hundred years ago, title to the lands didn’t lawfully transfer. Now it’s coming back to haunt U.S. authorities as disenfranchised Hawaiian heirs are asking pointed questions about their lands.”

Today most native Hawaiians are adamantly refusing to be stuck into a fake tribal nation. The U.S. government wants to do it anyway, whether Hawaiians like it or not, and whether anyone else living in Hawai`i likes it or not.

Having failed for 12 years to get the U.S. Congress to fabricate a fake Hawaiian tribal nation, the State of Hawai`i has now clumsily attempted to concoct one, to hand over, ready-made for the Department of the Interior to take into the fold of recognized American Indian tribes.

What has emerged, however, is so sloppy, so distasteful, so repulsive to Hawaiians and Americans, it will be extremely difficult for the Obama administration and the DOI to accept it, even if they held their noses.



Sunday, May 15, 2016

ENTHUSIASM IN ACTIVISM ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Activist To The Max - A Visit With Aunty Maxine Kahaulelio"

With literally decades of activism under her belt, Aunty Max is one of Hawai`iʻs most unique caretakers. Over the years sheʻs fought almost non-stop for Hawai`iʻs land and natural resources as well as itʻs people, culture and way of life all the while raising her own children as a widowed mother and a full time worker. When we met her, we soon found out she speaks her mind like few others. Donʻt miss our amazing visit with Aunty Max as she tells it like it is and reveals why activism has been such a big part of her life - Watch It Here

MONDAY, May 16th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 53 
MONDAY, May 16th At 7:00 PM & FRIDAY, May 20th At 5:30 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  
TUESDAY, May 17th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, May 19th At 7:30 PM  & SATURDAY, May 21st At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52


Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.


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Saturday, May 14, 2016

TOMORROW IN SAN DIEGO & ONLINE

























You are invited to attend this 'AHA ALOHA 'ĀINA Zoom Meeting with our San Diego `Ohana, Sunday, May 15th at 1:00 PM (HST) hosted by Dr. Kalama Oka Aina Niheu, MD


There are three ways you can join -

1. From your personal PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/779742877

2. iPhone one-tap: 14086380968,779742877# or 16465588656,779742877#

3. Or Telephone by dialing: +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll) or +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll)
Meeting ID: 779 742 877

Friday, May 13, 2016

TONIGHT IN UTAH



























Thursday, May 12, 2016

TELL THE DOI "NO!" TO FED WRECK

































Wednesday, May 11, 2016

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"BIG LIES THEYʻLL TELL IN DC"

The SCHHA & The CNHA Will Push For Fed Wreck In Washington, DC Next Week.

Two Things About Their Trip Are Sure To Leave You Breathless.

First, Theyʻll Be Meeting With Almost Every Power Broker & Second Theyʻll Be Telling Everyone That Hawaiians Want US Federal Recognition.

Watch This To Discover The One Important Thing Theyʻll Bring With Them & How You Can Help Stop Their Fed Wreck Scheme.


Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.



Tuesday, May 10, 2016

TMT TRYING TO CHEAT ONCE AGAIN ON MAUNA KEA

Honolulu Star-Advertiser, Sunday May 8, 2016

The state Department of Land and Natural Resources is giving us an ominous sense of Yogi Berra’s “deja vu all over again” as it stumbles through a second attempt at contested case hearings for the much-disputed Thirty Meter Telescope atop Mauna Kea.

The state Supreme Court voided TMT’s initial permit after finding the state “put the cart before the horse” by issuing the permit before settling the contested case filing by Native Hawaiians and other telescope foes.

So what did the Board of Land and Natural Resources do after being ordered by the court to redo the contested case process?

It appeared to put the cart before the horse again by starting the search for a hearings officer without providing public notice and input opportunity that TMT opponents say is required by the state Sunshine Law.

The hearings officer selected, former Hawai`i island Judge Riki May Amano, has a seemingly obvious conflict of interest as a dues-paying member since 2008 of the `Imiloa Astronomy Center at the University of Hawai`i-Hilo.

UH-Hilo is the formal applicant for the permit to allow TMT to build its $1.4 billion telescope on state land the university controls, and TMT is a sponsor of the `Imiloa center.

On Friday, BLNR rejected objections to Amano’s conflict by the Mauna Kea Hui, which represents telescope opponents, and unanimously reaffirmed her appointment.

Yes, opponents will object to everything to try to delay the case after TMT said it will pursue a site out of Hawai`i unless it has a permit to build on Mauna Kea by the end of the year.

But the reality facing BLNR is the Supreme Court made clear it’ll be a stickler for details; instead of making it easy for opponents, BLNR should be scrupulous and transparent in following the letter and spirit of the law.

Amano didn’t initially disclose her `Imiloa membership, claiming she was unaware of the astronomy center’s affiliation with UH-Hilo.

That’s hard to swallow.

`Imiloa, which Amano estimated she visited some 30 times over the years, is located on the UH-Hilo campus and is fronted by a rock wall with foot-high lettering that says:

`Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai`i

University of Hawai`i at Hilo

Nevertheless, BLNR accepted her explanation for not disclosing her membership and ruled, “A reasonable person knowing all the facts would not doubt the impartiality of Judge Amano.”

More likely, a reasonable person would expect BLNR to avoid choosing a hearings officer who belongs to an organization that’s dedicated to promoting astronomy on the Big Island and tied to a litigant in the case.

Now that Amano’s conflict is known, what sense does it make to risk another court smackdown — and a potentially longer delay in the case — when there are other qualified hearing officers who could preside without question of bias?