Thursday, January 18, 2018

WHAT DO YOU SEE?

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"STILL ALIVE AT 125"

Who Or What Could Still Exist After 125 Years?

Probably Only Something Very Strong With A Lot Of Integrity, Right?

Would You Believe Itʻs All Around You Every Single Day?

Watch This To Discover What It Is & Why After 125 Years The Secret Is Finally Getting Out.


Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.


HAWAIIAN KINGDOM STILL EXISTS 125 YEARS AFTER ILLEGAL OVERTHROW


























“I Live In The Hawaiian Kingdom” Assert Hawaiian Kingdom Nationals

The Coalition of Hawaiian Nationals will be out in force today at Onipa`a Kakou, the all-day event observing the one hundred twenty-fifth year of the illegal seizure of the Hawaiian Kingdom government.

Like countless who live in Hawai`i, event organizers and participants today intend to show the world that despite the illegal US overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom government one hundred twenty-five years ago, the Hawaiian Kingdom itself still exists.

“Whereʻs the Hawaiian Kingdom? Youʻre looking at it,” states Hawaiian Kingdom Foreign Minister Leon Kaulahao Siu.

“Hawai`i is my mainland. We will mark this important date as are many others by calling upon the US to de-occupy our nation - the Hawaiian Kingdom.”

“We want to let everyone know that while our Queenʻs government was illegally overthrown, and therefore has been in hiatus for one hundred twenty-five years, the Hawaiian Kingdom itself continues to exist uninterrupted because its citizens, Hawaiian Kingdom Nationals are still here.”

Minister Siu continued, “As we look to the future, our country, the sovereign, independent Kingdom of the Hawaiian Islands is awakening, coming alive again and everyone who calls Hawai`i home is welcome to be a part of it.”

Coalition of Hawaiian Nationals members and supporters will be holding Free Hawai`i and Hawaiian Independence banners and signs at events at `Iolani Palace as well as

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

TOMORROW - HAWAIIAN NATIONALS LOOK TO THE FUTURE AT ONIPA`A KAKOU

Their Goal - Rebuilding The Hawaiian Kingdom
 

































The Coalition of Hawaiian Nationals will be out in full force at Onipa`a, the all-day event observing the one hundred twenty-fifth year of the illegal seizure of the Hawaiian Kingdom government held on Wednesday, January 17th.

“We will mark this important date  as will many others by calling upon the US to de-occupy the Hawaiian Kingdom,” states Hawaiian Kingdom Foreign Minister Leon Kaulahao Siu.

“But we will also utilize this wonderful opportunity to focus everyoneʻs attention toward the future; to fire up the movement to Free Hawai`i and help people realize that our country, the sovereign, independent Kingdom of the Hawaiian Islands is awakening, coming alive again and that everyone, native Hawaiian or not, is welcome to be a key part of it.”

Coalition of Hawaiian Nationals members and supporters will be holding Free Hawai`i and Hawaiian Independence banners and signs at events at `Iolani Palace as well as the Hawai`i State Capitol that day as well as educating others about a Free Hawai`i.

While many Hawaiian Nationals are those who are living, modern day descendants of citizens of the Hawaiian Kingdom prior to the illegal overthrow in 1893, a Hawaiian National is any individual, native Hawaiian or not, who identifies as a citizen of and supports the Hawaiian Kingdom.

Significant events of Onipa`a Kakou will include a Peace March starting at 9 AM at the Royal Mausoleum which will end at `Iolani Palace where the Hawaiian Kingdom flag will be raised at 10:45 AM.

Expected to draw large crowds, this all-day event is free, open to the public, and will include hula, live music, cultural ceremonies arts and crafts and food.

Hawai`iʻs children, elders, parents and all families are invited to join together to mark this significant and historical day.

Monday, January 15, 2018

125th ANNIVERSARY OF HAWAIIAN KINGDOM GOVERNMENT OVERTHROW

Peace March Event From Mauna Ala To `Iolani Palace



























Onipa`a, an all day event observing the one hundred twenty-fifth year of the illegal seizure of the Hawaiian Kingdom government will be held Wednesday, January 17th.

Starting at sunrise and continuing throughout the day Hawaiian Kingdom Nationals and their supporters will mark this important date by calling upon the US to de-occupy the Hawaiian Kingdom.

On January 16 in 1893, without provocation or warning, the United States landed fully armed marines in Honolulu, giving military support to a handful of American businessmen who, on the next day, January 17, unseated Queen Lili`uokalani and seized control of the Hawaiian Kingdom.

In order to avoid bloodshed, Lili`uokalani temporarily yielded her power, not to the insurgents, but rather to the United States.

“In doing so the Queen identified to the world that the US involvement in causing a regime change was illegal and a serious breach of international law,” states Hawaiian Kingdom Foreign Minister Leon Kaulahao Siu.

“This put the responsibility on the US to correct this unlawful regime change. But one hundred twenty-five years later the people of Hawai`i are still waiting for the United States to do the right thing and Free Hawai`i.”

Significant events of the day include the Peace March starting at 9 AM at the Royal Mausoleum which will end at `Iolani Palace where the Hawaiian Kingdom flag will be raised at 10:45 AM.

Expected to draw large crowds, this all-day event is free, open to the public, and will include hula, live music, cultural ceremonies arts and crafts and food.

Hawai`iʻs children, elders, parents and all families are invited to join together to mark this significant and historical day.

Sunday, January 14, 2018

CHECKING TOOLS OUT IS WHATʻS ITʻS ABOUT ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Honolulu Tool Library - A Visit With Elia Bruno"

“Thereʻs actually a place where you can check out tools instead of books?” we asked when we first heard about the Honolulu Tool Library. Naturally we had to see it for ourselves and thatʻs how we met HNL Tool Library founder and director Elia Bruno. He showed us the library and explained itʻs based on a simple and yet powerful concept - why buy when you can borrow? Join us in our amazing visit with Elia at the HNL Tool Library and you too will see why the more we share, the more we have - Watch It Here

MONDAY, January 15th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 53 

MONDAY, January 15th At 5:30 PM & FRIDAY, January 19th At 4:30 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  

NEW! - Now More Na Leo O Hawai`i Air Dates -
TUESDAY, January 16th At 11:00 AM & SATURDAY, January 20th At 8:30 AMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, January 16th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, January 18th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, January 20th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52


Sneak Peek! -


"We Need To Do Healing Here - A Visit With Emily Kandagawa" 

How many people know exactly what theyʻre going to do and who theyʻre going to see the first time they step off a plane in Hawai`i? Emily Kandagawa did and when we heard what her plans were we knew we had to meet her. `Iolani Palace was her first stop and right after that was her meeting with Hawaiian cultural and political activist group Ka Lei Maile Ali`i. And all this from someone who did not grow up in Hawai`i. Donʻt miss our fascinating visit with Emily as she reveals how and why her arrival in Hawai`i and those two first meetings for her were ones that changed her life - Watch It Here

FRIDAY, January 19th At 8:00 PM & SATURDAY, January 20th  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.
 
For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, January 13, 2018

YOUR VOICE COUNTS - YOU WON!
















This last Tuesday, we asked you to contact the Office Of Hawaiian Affairs trustees and demand that they vote to SUPPORT HR.3744, which if passed, would strip the Executive branch of the US federal government of itʻs powers to recognize Indian tribes without the approval of the US congress.

Your voices were heard loud and clear.

While they did not vote to support this bill, enough of them chose to not vote at all.

They fell short of the four votes needed to have OHA officially oppose HR. 3744.

Mahalo!

Friday, January 12, 2018

ARE HAWAIIANS UNIFIED?

Thursday, January 11, 2018

REMEMBERING THE ILLEGAL OVERTHROW


























Honolulu Star-Advertiser - January 8, 2018 - By Timothy Hurley

In January 1993 the 100th anniversary of the overthrow of Hawaii’s last monarch was observed in a multiday series of events that culminated in a solemn march of about 10,000 people to Iolani Palace for a day of speeches, music and remembrance.

Twenty-five years later a new group of organizers is planning a similar event with a march and observance ceremony expected to draw thousands to Iolani Palace and to the Capitol courtyard next door.

It’s a coincidence that the anniversary falls on the same date — Wednesday, Jan. 17 — as the opening day of the 2018 state Legislature, but organizers of Onipaa Kakou are hoping the occasion will send a loud message to lawmakers as they launch their session.

“Truth and unity,” said Walter Ritte, the veteran sovereignty activist from Molokai and one of the event’s chief organizers. “We want to tell the Legislature the truth about the history of the overthrow and the illegal annexation and to tell them about the unity of the Hawaiian people.”

Getting the message across about unity could be thorny, however. The rift between those who favor a form of sovereignty within the jurisdiction of the United States and those who insist on a fully independent nation appears to be as strong as ever.

But Ritte, who supports an independent Hawaii, said that while Hawaiians don’t all agree on the pathway to a solution, they all agree on the truth about the legality of the overthrow — and that’s what the day is about.

At the Capitol, speeches will be balanced by University of Hawaii Hawaiian studies professor Jon Osorio, an advocate of independence,

and former Gov. John Waihee, who has been raising money for efforts to establish the Na‘i Aupuni constitution, which allows for a federally recognized government.

At the palace, however, the schedule appears to veer toward voices of independence, with speeches by firebrands Andre Perez of Oahu, Kahookahi Kanuha of Hawaii island and UH-Maui College Hawaiian studies professor Kaleikoa Kaeo, each of whom has been arrested multiple times in recent years in defense of the cause.

Among other scheduled speakers are UH law professor Williamson Chang, Office of Hawaiian Affairs CEO Kamanaopono Crabbe and veteran sovereignty activist and attorney Mililani Trask.

As leader of Ka Lahui Hawaii, Trask was front and center in the 1993 Onipaa centennial, marking the day when Queen Lili‘uokalani was forced to yield her throne in a coup backed by U.S Marines.

Trask and her older sister, Haunani-Kay Trask, then director of the UH School of Hawaiian Studies, helped lead the march from Aloha Tower to Iolani Place.

Despite the somber occasion, said Mililani Trask, “It was a time of positive, uplifting and hopeful sentiment.”

Coverage by The Honolulu Advertiser described the event as being marked “by as much bitterness as warmth, and as much divisiveness as unity.”

The most incendiary remarks came from the elder Trask.

“I am not an American,” she declared from the palace bandstand. “We are not Americans. Say it in your heart. Say it in your sleep. We will never forget what the Americans have done to us — never, never, never. The Americans, my people, are our enemies.”

Waihee, the governor at the time, had ordered that the American flag not be flown in the palace area during the event, but Haunani-Kay Trask said Waihee didn’t go far enough.

“It should be burned to the ground,” she said.

And on a day when a representative of the United Church of Christ formally apologized for the complicity of the church’s missionary descendants in the overthrow, Trask urged the Hawaiians to spurn the church because it teaches Hawaiians to be compliant.

“Don’t make nice. Never make nice. … Fight. Fight. Fight.”

Later in the day the late Kinau Boyd Kamalii, OHA trustee, urged Hawaiians to reject the “politics of hate,” and then-U.S. Sen. Daniel Akaka called for unity and diversity that “must not bring divisiveness.”

“I am proud to be Hawaiian,” Kamalii said. “I am also proud to be an American.”

Then-OHA Chairman Clayton Hee told the crowd he would ask for state funding for a Native Hawaiian constitutional convention.

“We cannot wait for Congress,” he declared, almost prophetically, as Congress would fail to enact the Akaka Bill, which sought nation-within-a-nation status for Native Hawaiians.

No fights, no injuries

Despite the huge crowd that converged at Iolani Palace on Jan. 17, 1993, there were no incidents or arrests that day or over the course of the five-day event.

It’s unlikely a similarly sized crowd will be seen at the 125-year observance. For one, the 1993 centennial fell on a Sunday, while the 125th is on a Wednesday.

But shuttles are being planned to bring people from across the island, thanks in part to funding by OHA and Kamehameha Schools, and event organizer Trisha Kehaulani Watson said she expects thousands to show their support for the deposed queen and her memory.

“It’s a sad day for us, a hard day,” she said.

Instead of starting off at Aloha Tower, a “peace march” is scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. at the Mauna Ala royal mausoleum in Nuuanu Valley, where Lili‘uokalani is buried.

As the procession nears Iolani Palace, Watson said, there will be an attempt to re-create the Ed Greevy photo used for the cover of Haunani-Kay Trask’s book “From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawai‘i,” which was published later that year.

A similar image by veteran Honolulu Star-Advertiser photographer Bruce Asato — showing the march’s leaders, including the Trask sisters, pausing to allow elders to enter the palace grounds first — appeared on the front page of The Honolulu Advertiser.

What could prove to be the most moving highlight of this year’s event, according to organizers, will be the 10:45 p.m. raising of the Hawaiian flag above the palace at the same time of day it was taken down during the overthrow. The event is being planned by the Royal Order of Kamehameha.

The Capitol activities will begin at noon — two hours after the

29th state Legislature launches its 2018 regular session amid ceremony. The Onipaa Kakou observance will return to Iolani Palace from 1 to 6 p.m.

While the 1993 entertainment featured Israel Kamakawiwo‘ole and the Makaha Sons of Niihau, the 2018 headliners are Amy Hanaiali‘i and Keauhou.

Another event, called E Ola na Mele Lahui, will take place at the Hawaii Supreme Court on King Street at 6 p.m. Sponsored by the Judiciary History Center, the Hawaii State Bar Association Civic Education Committee and the Dolores Furtado Martin Foundation, the program will explore “Hawaiian political expression through mele and hula, linking new archival documents and newspaper articles on the overthrow to Hawaii’s legal history.”

Looking back at the Onipaa a quarter-century later, Mililani Trask said she was proud to have had a role in an event that not only honored the queen’s memory, but left a legacy of activism and thousands of new Native Hawaiian registered voters.

“There were 20,000 people, and we didn’t have a single injury or fight,” she said, noting that alcohol was strictly prohibited.

Trask said she plans to tell her audience this year to remember the overthrow but, at the same time, to celebrate their resiliency as a people and to continue the path forward.

Many other indigenous people, their cultures and languages have been driven to extinction, she said, but Hawaiians are not only still fighting for their rights and practicing their culture, but expanding in number.

“Despite the overthrow and the Apology Bill showing how illegal it was, our people haven’t given up. They haven’t resorted to violence like so many others,” she said. “We are still here. That is something to be proud of.”

Trask said there are so many more issues for Hawaiians to consider beyond self-governance, including the protection of sacred sites and resources, homelessness, poverty, drug violence and the impact of Honolulu’s rail project on Hawaiians, among others.

“Hawaiians can be a forceful voting block,” she said.

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"WILL YOU STAND FOR THIS?"

How Long Are You Willing To Put Up With It?

How Long Before You Say “Enough Is Enough.”

How Long Before You Realize You Need To Take A Stand?

Watch This To See Who Was Forced To Stand Down & Why You Should Stand Up.


Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.


Tuesday, January 09, 2018

ALERT! - TELL OHA YOU SUPPORT HR.3744















EXTREMELY IMPORTANT INFORMATION - PLEASE READ IMMEDIATELY

HR 3744 - The Tribal Recognition Act -


If passed in the US Congress, HR 3744 would remove both the Executive Branch and by extension the US Department of Interiorʻs authority to recognize and therefore create a Native Hawaiian Tribe.


HR 3744, if passed, would require AN ACT OF THE ENTIRE US CONGRESS for any acknowledgement of a tribe should Robin Danner of the SCHHA and Michelle Kauhane of the CNHA attempt a government-to-government relationship with the US.


The administration of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs is recommending to the OHA trustees they vote to officially OPPOSE HR 3744.


HR 3744 will be on the agenda as "115th Congress Legislative Positioning Matrix 1" at tomorrowʻs OHA BAE Committee meeting at 1 PM at OHA headquarters.


If approved a vote of ratification will occur Thursday, January 11th at the regular 10 AM BOT meeting at OHA headquarters.

DEMAND THAT  OHA VOTES IN SUPPORT OF HR 3744.

Please attend tomorrowʻs BAE meeting at 1 PM at OHA headquarters to testify in support of HR 3744.

Please attend Thursdayʻs 10AM BOT meeting to ensure the OHA trustees vote to ratify support for HR 3744.

If you cannot attend, please contact OHA trustees to demand they vote to support HR 3744.

Please contact OHA today -

Collette Machado - colettem@oha.org - (808) 594-1837
Bob Lindsey - robertl@oha.org - (808) 594-1855
Peter Apo - petera@oha.org - (808) 594-1854
John Waihe`e Jr. - crayna@oha.org (808) 594-1876
Rowena Akana - rowenaa@oha.org (808) 594-1860
Keli`i Akina - TrusteeAkina@oha.org (808) 594-1976
Carmen Hulu Lindsey - hulul@oha.org (808) 594-1858
Dan Ahuna - dana@oha.org (808) 594-1751
Lei Ahu Isa - leia@oha.org (808) 594-1857

Kamana'opono Crabbe - kamanaoc@oha.org

OHA Headquarters - (808) 594-1835

Mahalo.

Monday, January 08, 2018

ONIPA`A KAKOU - 
THE DAY IS FOR OUR QUEEN









































Open Letter to the Hawaiian Community -

On January 17, 2018, we are embarking on a most ambitious venture - unity.

Unity does not mean that we need to all be of one mind. We will never achieve that, let us recognize that now. Yet, let us say that we believe we agree in our aloha for our culture and our history. Let us agree in the need for a better future for our children. Let us agree that our homeland needs to be protected.

Let us start with all the things we do agree upon; our differences can wait until tomorrow.

On December 20, 2017, I was asked by Uncle Walter Ritte, who I have worked with for many years, to assist in the coordination of the activities taking place in commemoration of the 125th Anniversary of the overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom. 

The purpose of coordinating activities was 1) to ensure the safety of all participants, 2) encourage the various groups planning activities for the day were working in concert with each other, and 3) to leverage our events to best honor our Queen. We believed, and still believe, that by working together, in unity, we could stand with our Queen and demonstrate to the government the urgency needed in addressing Hawaiian issues.

We are going to send the message that change is not simply coming – but here.

This committee was formed, because many groups were already, individually, of their own accord, taking the initiative to commemorate the day. No one entity has co-opted the day. Everyone is working together. Everyone is welcome. The day belongs to everyone. The day is for our Queen.

125 years after the day our Queen was forced at gunpoint to stand down, we will stand up.

We will stand up and continue our march into a better, brighter future. One uplifted by truth. One empowered by history. One driven by knowledge. One where Hawaiians are educated, where we speak our native tongue, where practice our culture freely, where have access to our natural resources, and where we are no longer second class citizens in our own home.

This march actually began generations ago by the countless kūpuna who never stopping resisting. Those who never stopped speaking their language, even in the face of violence. Those kūpuna who remained Royalists, even when the penalty was potentially death. The kūpuna who held onto the light in the darkest hours. They protected the light that is now a flame.

We owe them everything.

We want to make it absolutely clear to everyone that safety and security has been our top priority. Aside from HPD, who the Royal Order of Kamehameha has been in regular contact with, I have personally been in contact with the House Sergeant of Arms, the Senate Sergeant of Arms, the Director of Public Safety, the Deputy Director of Transportation Services, the Administrator and Deputy Administrator of DLNR Parks, and the head of Security at `Iolani Palace. DLNR Parks has been coordinating with DLNR DOCARE for us. We have secured all the necessary permits for all the events of the day. We have hired additional security per request of DLNR Parks to ensure that the Hale Ali`i, which is a sacred site, is adequately protected at all times. We have made the safety and security of the event participants and cultural resources our top priority.

Prince Kūhiō was an Ali`i. He was a Royalist who went to prison for trying to overthrow the Republic of Hawai`i to restore his Kingdom. He was a Statesman, an eventually a US Congressman. He reorganized the Royal Order of Kamehameha. He established Hawaiian Homes. He founded the Civic Clubs. He was as diverse as the very people participating in the events on January 17th in honor of his second cousin, Lili`uokalani.

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join the Hawaiian community on January 17th as we honor our Queen, walk with our kūpuna, and inspire a brighter future for all of Hawai`i.

Me ka pono,
 

Trisha Kehaulani Watson-Sproat
Wife, mother, kanaka, and one of many organizers of ‘Onipa`a Kākou


OnipaaKakou.org  
Onipaa Kakou

Sunday, January 07, 2018

HOW COOL - A LIBRARY FOR TOOLS ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Honolulu Tool Library - A Visit With Elia Bruno"

“Thereʻs actually a place where you can check out tools instead of books?” we asked when we first heard about the Honolulu Tool Library. Naturally we had to see it for ourselves and thatʻs how we met HNL Tool Library founder and director Elia Bruno. He showed us the library and explained itʻs based on a simple and yet powerful concept - why buy when you can borrow? Join us in our amazing visit with Elia at the HNL Tool Library and you too will see why the more we share, the more we have - Watch It Here

MONDAY, January 8th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 53 

MONDAY,January 8th At 5:30 PM & FRIDAY, January 12th At 4:30 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  

NEW! - Now More Na Leo O Hawai`i Air Dates -
TUESDAY, January 9th At 11:00 AM & SATURDAY, January 13th At 8:30 AMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, January 9th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, January 11th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, January 13th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52

SATURDAY, January 13th  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, January 06, 2018

WILL YOU BE THERE?
 

Friday, January 05, 2018

ONIPA`A PEACE MARCH - JANUARY 17TH

Thursday, January 04, 2018

STEADFAST FOR A FREE HAWAI`I

Wednesday, January 03, 2018

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"WHAT HAPPENS TWO WEEKS FROM TODAY?"

When Was The Darkest Day In Hawai`iʻs History?

Do You Know What Happened On That Day?

Why Will It Be Publicly Observed Two Weeks From Today?

Watch This As We Explain What It Is & Why People Will Be Gathering To Remember The Past & Find The Way Forward.


Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.


Tuesday, January 02, 2018

2017 - A BANNER YEAR & MUCH PROGRESS
 

 



















The 174th anniversaries of the national holidays Lā Hoʻihoʻi Eā and Lā Kūʻokoʻa were widely and more intently celebrated throughout the Hawaiian Islands. The events reminded us of the sovereign and equal status attained by the Hawaiian Kingdom among the great powers of the earth.

The celebrations of the life of Queen Lili`uokalani — her 179th birthday in September and the 100th year since her passing in November — both served to emphasize her grace, wisdom and courage, making all the more heinous, the hewa committed against her and the people of her Kingdom. The wrongful taking is coming more into focus to a broader audience and with it, better understanding of the need to Free Hawai`i.

The Kū`e intensified — with actions against the TMT project on Mauna Kea and the solar telescope on Haleakalā; with high profile questions over land titles (particularly on Kaua`i with issues involving Zuckerberg, Wainiha, Coco Palms…); with uncovering judicial abuse of Hawaiian nationals (such as the wrongful detention of Robert Warren Jr.); and so forth.

And social media was ablaze with alerts, calls to action, information and discussions, getting people more maʻa to our condition and more committed to making things pono.

Meanwhile, significant progress was made in arenas not so visible… such as in international legal and diplomatic venues.

2018 Will Be Even Better! A Year Of Breakthroughs

 
January 17 is the 125th anniversary of the real "Day of Infamy" in the Hawaiian Islands, when the peaceful Hawaiian Kingdom suffered a sneak attacked by U.S. armed forces in collusion with insurgents to cause a regime change.


This year, 2018, starting with the 125th anniversary of the “overthrow,” is a great opportunity to heighten awareness locally and globally of our situation and our resolve to Free Hawai`i. Besides using ʻOnipa`a Kākou to engage the press, the general public, the visitors, the state legislature (coincidentally opening its 2018 session on the same Day of Infamy) and the media, we will be working to gain coverage by the international press/media of our efforts to Free Hawai`i.

There are many other key dates this year that we plan to utilize to amplify our story, gain exposure and rally support to Free Hawaii.

Also, Hawaiian nationals will be pressuring the "State of Hawai`i” on a number of issues. One is to stop the Stateʻs blatant discrimination in its maltreatment and persecution of Hawaiian nationals due to our national origin. This form of discrimination is strictly prohibited by state, federal and international law. We will be mounting several other challenges to the legitimacy of the State of Hawai`i.

This is also the year we will be projecting our vision forward by discussing and starting in earnest to plan what Hawaii will be like as a sovereign, independent country.

Itʻs going to be a great year! Stay tuned!

Malama pono,
Leon Siu

Monday, January 01, 2018

BECOME A FAN OF "VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`I'S FUTURE" ON FACEBOOK

See Behind The Scenes Shots Of Our Shows




    



















Click HERE To Become A Fan

Sunday, December 31, 2017

HONOLULU TOOL LIBRARY ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Honolulu Tool Library - A Visit With Elia Bruno"

“Thereʻs actually a place where you can check out tools instead of books?” we asked when we first heard about the Honolulu Tool Library. Naturally we had to see it for ourselves and thatʻs how we met HNL Tool Library founder and director Elia Bruno. He showed us the library and explained itʻs based on a simple and yet powerful concept - why buy when you can borrow? Join us in our amazing visit with Elia at the HNL Tool Library and you too will see why the more we share, the more we have - Watch It Here

MONDAY, January 1st At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 53 

MONDAY,January 1st At 5:30 PM & FRIDAY, January 5th At 4:30 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  

NEW! - Now More Na Leo O Hawai`i Air Dates -
TUESDAY,January 2nd At 7:30 AM & SATURDAY, January 6th At 9:30 AMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, January 2nd At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, January 4th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, January 6th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52

FRIDAY, January 5th At 8:00 PM & SATURDAY, January 6th  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, December 30, 2017

HAS THE ILLEGAL US OCCUPATION OF HAWAI`I WORKED?



Like many incidents in courtrooms where a situation erupts suddenly into a physical struggle, an interruption at Friday’s session of the trial to decide whether Native Hawaiians who have occupied the Coco Palms Resort property in Wailua should be thrown off the land arose suddenly.

During the morning session, in which the legendary Coco Palms performer Larry Rivers was being asked a seemingly endless series of questions completely unrelated to the case, the courtroom audience grew restless.

First, Punohu Kekaualua, of Wailua, made a remark out loud questioning the judge’s authority, for which he was ejected and his cell phone confiscated. His mother, 70-year-old Debra Kekaualua, of Anahola, came to his verbal defense and she, too, was ejected.

A half hour or so later, when court reconvened after a recess, Punohu Kekaualua got into an argument with a court bailiff about whether he had been thrown out of court for the entire day’s session. Court personnel checked with Judge Michael Soong, who told them both Kekaualuas were banished all day.

But Debra Kekaualua had different ideas. She spoke up, objecting loudly to her son being thrown out of court. Bailiff Lee Jeal decided he had heard and seen enough. He ordered all spectators to leave the courtroom. But before people could reach the doorway, he walked into the back corner of the very last bench, where Debra Kekaualua was sitting.

As she continued her verbal protest, Jeal picked her up and, as she struggled, carried her a few feet and then appeared to drop her back onto the bench. Things got really ugly after that.

Angrily, Jeal summoned additional uniformed security officers from the Hawaii Department of Public Safety — the sheriff’s office. They succeeded in getting everyone out of the courtroom and closed and locked the door.

But it wasn’t over yet.

From the hallway, Debra Kekaualua could be heard screaming. She was being, as the incident could be pieced together later, handcuffed and taken to a holding cell.

By this point, the tension in the courtroom and the hallway was palpable and threatened to get out of control of court personnel. Kauai Police Department officers were called. Since the courthouse is directly across the street from police headquarters, KPD arrived within a few minutes, in force — five patrol cars and about 10 officers, including at least one lieutenant.

Debra Kekaualua emerged from the courthouse, having been freed by the court security officers. She was bleeding from both wrists, as well as her ankles. She said she sustained the injuries when she was cuffed and removed. She said she was told no charges would be filed against her. She went off to Wilcox Memorial Hospital.

As incidents in courthouses that get a little out of hand go, this one was unusually unfortunate. Jeal might have chosen an action different from picking up a very slightly built older woman and then dropping her as a couple of dozen spectators looked on and shouts of indignation became deafening. The optics, as they say, could probably not have been worse.

It being 2017, the incident was captured by numerous cell phone videos shot by spectators, getting to Facebook and other social media outlets within minutes.

The Garden Island’s Bethany Freudenthal caught the action on video, as well.

KPD officers later questioned witnesses after Debra Kekaualua complained she had been assaulted. They said they would review witness accounts to determine if any law enforcement action was required. There was no immediate announcement of whether the court or the sheriff’s office would conduct internal investigations.

The episode could be just another distraction in a case that appears to be proceeding in parallel universes. The plaintiffs —Tyler Greene and Chad Waters, the would-be redevelopers of Coco Palms — argue that the Native Hawaiian occupiers are on their property illegally and must be evicted under applicable Hawai`i and United States law.

The defendants, Noa Mau Espirito and Kamu Hepa, argue that Kingdom of Hawai`i land use law should prevail and they have repeatedly questioned whether the court has jurisdiction. They back that argument up by citing, among many other things, so-called royal patents, ownership documents involving land, awarded during the Kingdom days. They claim ownership of the property.

Unfortunately, that ignores the judge’s reality, which is that he has no choice but to apply applicable state law, which, experts in Native Hawai`i law have said, may render the royal patents essentially meaningless.

Confoundingly, Judge Soong has ruled he has no jurisdiction over whether the Coco Palms developers hold legal title to the property, which, he said, would need to be decided by another judge in another court.

Coco Palms, on the other hand, argues that establishing they have a legal title is unnecessary since all the resort property needs to prove is they have a deed and title insurance and are in legal possession.

Under Hawai`i law, there is apparently sound basis for this seemingly incongruous division of authority between two courts. But this is one example of how our legal system may make perfect sense to lawyers and judges, but leaves ordinary lay people puzzled. To put it mildly.

So it is, perhaps, not entirely surprising that Friday’s incident boiled over into a 70-year-old woman being picked up, then dropped, by a bailiff in the courtroom where the case is being tried as the proceeding devolved.

Many people have trouble understanding how the court system works. When the elements of disputing the jurisdiction of that court system mix with what was, at the very least, an undignified response to a woman expressing her opinions critical of the court, it is little wonder that the episode deteriorated so completely, and so quickly.

So in about 10 minutes on a Friday morning, disagreement over what the law is and what it means collided with operation of a court system many people simply don’t understand.