Saturday, February 24, 2018

NUMBERS DONʻT LIE - PEOPLE LIE
 

Friday, February 23, 2018

OFFICE OF HAWAIIAN AFFAIRS TRUSTEE CALLS FOR FIRING OF CEO

 Honolulu Civil Beat - February 20, 2018

A board member for a state agency dedicated to helping Native Hawaiians is calling for the organization’s chief executive officer to step down in light of a damning state audit alleging widespread misspending.

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs is a semi-autonomous state agency that manages a $600 million trust for the benefit of Hawai`i’s indigenous people.

A state audit recently revealed both the chief executive officer and the members of the Board of Trustees have spent millions of dollars without proper oversight and rules.

OHA Trustee Keli`i Akina, a fiscal conservative, issued a press release Tuesday calling for the removal of Kamana`opono Crabbe, the organization’s chief executive officer.

The audit found Crabbe sometimes overrode staff recommendation to approve expenditures. In 2015 and 2016 Crabbe exceeded his discretionary budget for sponsorships by more than $300,000, Akina wrote.

“Failure to act decisively to remove the CEO, considering the overwhelming evidence presented by the state Auditor, would be a dereliction of our fiduciary duty as Trustees to protect the Native Hawaiian trust fund,” Akina said in the press release.

Crabbe did not reply to a request for comment. But OHA Board of Trustees Chairwoman Collette Machado issued a statement Tuesday evening criticizing Akina’s description of the audit.

She said that it’s a “gross mischaracterization” to say OHA misspent millions. While the audit criticized the discretionary process for spending $14 million, the money still went to important programs helping Native Hawaiians. Machado added that the state auditor didn’t recommend firing the CEO.

“The employment of OHA’s CEO is a confidential, personnel matter for the full Board of Trustees to decide and inappropriate to discuss in public,” she said in  the statement.

Machado says the first issue the board will take up will be a moratorium on the use of certain funds criticized in the audit — including CEO sponsorships and trustee allowances — until their policies are updated. The next board meeting is next week.

But Healani Sonoda-Pale, an OHA beneficiary who chairs Ka Lahui Political Action Committee, says that while she likes and respects Crabbe personally, she agrees with Akina.

“This has been festering and going on for so long,” she said. “Something has to change.”

What About The Trustees?

Akina’s call to remove Crabbe isn’t unexpected, but it ignores the audit’s highly critical findings regarding the trustees themselves.

The audit found board members tripled their individual allowances and spent them on fancy dinners, trip upgrades, and favors to beneficiaries. The audit detailed the expenses in a lengthy appendix that didn’t identify any of the trustees. The expenses included money to pay for a beneficiary’s rent and funding for another’s trip to Las Vegas to compete in a rodeo competition.

One trustee gave thousands of dollars to God’s Ohana Day on Molokai despite a prohibition against donations to faith-based organizations. Hundreds of dollars also went to support Maui County Mayor Alan Arakawa’s campaign despite a rule barring political contributions.
But the audit noted that board members were unwilling to sanction one another for misusing their allowances. No trustee has ever been sanctioned despite flagrant rule violations, the audit found.

Akina has asked his fellow trustees to pay back any money that they misspent. But he doesn’t know if anyone has done that yet, and he hasn’t called for any trustees to be sanctioned.

“The reason I am urgently focused upon the CEO is that this person currently has executive power to spend vast amounts of money, unlike the individual trustees,” Akina wrote in an email Tuesday.

“The financial expenditures for which the CEO was responsible, pointed out by the state auditor, dwarf the spending by trustees from their trustee allowances. This does not justify any trustee misspending, but puts in perspective the importance of dealing with the CEO issue immediately.”

Akina says that he personally has not spent any money from his trustee allowance but says he plans to do so once there is better oversight of the money. He says his focus on Crabbe doesn’t excuse any trustees who have misspent their allowances....

Thursday, February 22, 2018

KELI`I AKINA URGES OHA BOARD TO REMOVE CEO














 
 






Office of Hawaiian Affairs Trustee Keli`i Akina is publicly calling on the OHA Board of Trustees to take action to remove CEO Kamana`opono Crabbe, after a scathing audit revealed serious financial mismanagement.

“Although the state audit reveals that OHA’s CEO is personally responsible for the misspending of millions of dollars, the Trustees who allow him to remain in place are now just as complicit,” Trustee Akina said.  

“Failure to act decisively to remove the CEO, considering the overwhelming evidence presented by the state Auditor, would be a dereliction of our fiduciary duty as Trustees to protect the Native Hawaiian trust fund.”

After months of rigorous examination of OHA grants, sponsorships and spending in fiscal years 2015 and 2016, the state audit identified gross financial mismanagement and inappropriate spending.

According to the state Auditor, there were numerous instances where the CEO ignored grants staff recommendations, effectively overriding processes put in place to ensure fairness and impartiality. 

“Although $7 million of Native Hawaiian trust funds were awarded by OHA in accordance with strict internal policies and controls, twice that amount- $14 million- flowed out of OHA through loosely-administered, noncompetitive methods,” Trustee Akina continued.  “While the OHA Board had knowledge of some of these expenditures, the CEO should be working with us, and not against us, in fulfilling our fiduciary duty over the funds.”

The state Auditor also found that in fiscal year 2015, the CEO exceeded his discretionary sponsorship budget of $65,000 to award a total amount of $285,499. Similarly, in 2016, the CEO exceeded his discretionary sponsorship budget of $100,000, and funds expended totaled $210,700.

“The findings of the state audit are egregious, but are merely the tip of the iceberg. They validate the need for a more comprehensive, independent audit.  For example, the state Auditor raised questions about, but did not investigate, OHA’s limited liability companies for which OHAs CEO is a manager,” said Trustee Akina.  “The need to conduct this independent audit without delay or interference is one more reason the CEO must be removed immediately.” 

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"MAKE COLETTE MACHADO DO THE RIGHT THING"

Office Of Hawaiian Affairs Chair Colette Machado Is At It Again.

Lots Of Promises With No Real Action.

This Time Sheʻs Promising To Clean Up OHA After The State Audit Results.

Watch This To See How You Can Make Colette Machado Turn Her Words Into Action.
 


Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

FREE TO THE PUBLIC THIS FRIDAY IN HONOLULU

Monday, February 19, 2018

BECOME A FAN OF "VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`I'S FUTURE" ON FACEBOOK

See Behind The Scenes Shots Of Our Shows



    





























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Sunday, February 18, 2018

DEFENDING HAWAI`IʻS OCEANS ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Ocean Defender - A Visit With Leilei Shih"

Once you meet her, youʻll see she was born an activist. Both a marine geochemist and the O`ahu Sierra Clubʻs Conservation Chair, Leilei Shih is definitely a defender of the worlds oceans. But not only oceans as she also created a community farm which grows land to table fresh food for people. Join us in our amazing visit with Leilei at beautiful Kane`ohe Bay and youʻll see why sheʻs so passionate about all things living -
Watch It Here


MONDAY, February 19th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 54

MONDAY, February 19th At 5:30 PM ; FRIDAY, February 23rd At 8:30 AMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  

NEW! - Now More Na Leo O Hawai`i Air Dates -
TUESDAY, February 20th At 10:30 AM & SATURDAY, February 24th At 2:00 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, February 20th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, February 22nd At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, February 24th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52

SATURDAY, February 24th  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, February 17, 2018

FIGHTING FOR HAWAI`IʻS HOUSELESS






















Honolulu Civil Beat - February 14, 2018

The state has no immediate plans to clear out a well-established homeless encampment near the Wai`anae Boat Harbor, according to state homeless coordinator Scott Morishige. 

But community members and residents of Pu`uhonua O Wai`anae fear a sweep is increasingly likely. 

About 15 of them gathered at the Capitol on Wednesday to defend the camp after recent criticism from some city and state leaders.

“The village is a safe and stable place to live,” said Twinkle Borge, the camp’s leader. 

“We want to dialogue with people to make a decision about our future. We want to keep our `ohana together as much as possible. We are open to exploring all options including relocation.”

She said more than half of the roughly 200 camp residents are Native Hawaiian.

Many of the people who gathered Wednesday had planned to attend a House Health and Human Services Committee hearing to testify on a measure that would have exempted people living in the camp, which is on state land, from criminal trespassing laws. 

But on Tuesday, committee Chair Rep. John Mizuno pulled HB 2754 from the hearing agenda. He was not immediately available for comment Wednesday afternoon.

Rep. Della Au Bellati, who introduced the bill, said even though it was tabled for the session, the measure generated important discussions about what the state should do about the encampment.

Borge said people in the camp are often blamed for crime, vandalism and dumping trash in the area, including dumping human waste into Pokai Bay.

Pokai Bay is a far walk from Wai`anae Boat Harbor,” Borge said. “Nobody is walking down Farrington with their buckets of waste and pouring it into the bay.”

Morishige and Rep. Cedric Gates, who represents Wai`anae, both support plans to move people living on the land elsewhere, provided they receive advance notice and that permanent or transitional housing options are offered.

“It’s been clear that at some point there will be a transition of people out of that area,” Morishige said. “That won’t occur without prior notice.”

Morishige said the state has long offered outreach services to people who live in the camp.

He said the site on land controlled by the Department of Land and Natural Resources isn’t appropriate for an encampment because human activity might impact the natural resources there, including a rare shrimp found in ponds in the area.

Borge said she asked the DLNR to bring a biologist to the camp to teach residents how to protect the shrimp.

She said many people in the encampment have tried and failed to find permanent housing or found homeless shelters unsuitable.

Borge told Civil Beat she would prefer the state allow people to continue living at the camp, adding that the measure tabled Tuesday might have bought her time to negotiate a deal with the state to either remain on the parcel or find land to relocate to.

Friday, February 16, 2018

OHA RESERVES PLUMMET FROM $15 MILLION TO ONLY $2 MILLION IN FIVE YEARS


















West Hawai`i Today - February 14, 2018

The state agency responsible for improving the well-being of Native Hawaiians spent nearly double the amount on pet projects than on competitive grants, the state auditor said in a report released Tuesday. 

Office of Hawaiian Affairs discretionary spending included $1,900 to send someone to a rodeo competition in Las Vegas and $1,000 for a trustee’s son’s medical expenses.

The agency’s discretionary spending totaled $14 million in fiscal years 2015 and 2016. That’s compared to $7.7 million for competitive grants. Over the same period, the agency withdrew $6 million from its fiscal reserve.

The agency doesn’t rigorously vet and monitor this discretionary spending as its own formal grant process requires, the auditor said. Its administration approves some discretionary spending without the Board of Trustees voting or even knowing about it, the report said.

Agency Chairwoman Colette Machado said in a statement the agency was committed to making changes necessary to best serve Native Hawaiians. She said she already proposed moratoriums on the use of fiscal reserve funds and trustee sponsorships.

“OHA acknowledges the auditor’s findings that we must endeavor to institute and enforce disciplined spending through clearly defined, objective and responsible policies and protocols,” Machado said. “This will better enable OHA to uphold its solemn trust obligations to our beneficiaries.”

Other examples of questionable spending cited by the report included $1,000 for a beneficiary’s rent and $1,000 for another’s funeral-related clothing expenses.

The report asked whether providing funds to an individual Native Hawaiian for personal expenses was consistent with the trustees’ fiduciary duty to many other beneficiaries. The report also asked whether such spending was consistent with state law.

Some of discretionary spending went to community initiatives with broad public support, such as $300,000 to help the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s worldwide canoe expedition.

The auditor’s report indicated the free-wheeling spending was affecting the agency’s broader financial health.

The agency’s fiscal reserves — which according to guidelines established in 2003 are designed to provide funds in the event of emergency — peaked at $23 million in 2006.

Between 2011 and 2016, the board allowed the annual maximum of $3 million to be withdrawn from the reserves, leading the balance to plummet more than 80 percent from $15 million to $2 million.

The auditor recommended that trustees hold each other accountable for actions “inconsistent with their collective fiduciary duties and responsibilities to trust beneficiaries.” It suggested that the agency consider requiring board approval for all grants and other funding.

Thursday, February 15, 2018

OHA AUDIT - MILLIONS MISSPENT






















Honolulu Star-Advertiser - February 15, 2018

This is a time of tremendous need for Native Hawaiians, who are disproportionately beset by poverty, homelessness, imprisonment and social problems. Now would be the time for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs and its trustees to focus their considerable funding resources to help the beneficiaries of that trust.

But as all can see from the stunning report released Tuesday by the Office of the State Auditor, quite the opposite has happened. OHA, according to the latest audit, has misspent millions in discretionary funding that should have been properly vetted and directed to the people who need it most.

The agency was authorized in the 1978 Constitutional Convention for the deployment of resources set aside for those of Native Hawaiian ancestry, and the first board of trustees was elected in 1980. Revenues gleaned from the “ceded lands” dating to the kingdom days are legally reserved in part to benefit the indigenous people of the state. The money is gathered into an investment trust overseen by OHA’s nine elected trustees.

OHA protested when a draft of the audit was leaked a few weeks prematurely, and now it’s painfully clear why.

The final report indicated a lack of fiscal controls over the Native Hawaiian Trust Fund, a laxity that goes back decades but persists to a startling degree now. During the 2015 and 2016 budget years, the agency spent $14 million in discretionary funds, nearly twice the $7.7 million that went through its regular budget process.

This had not been budgeted, so OHA drew from its reserves to cover most of it. These are the reserves that are supposed to generate the funds for the continuation of its mission, and blowing through those funds represents an appalling lapse.
OHA Chairperson Colette Machado issued a statement on behalf of the board. It essentially was an acknowledgement of guilt.

“We appreciate that this audit is intended to help OHA improve so that we can better fulfill our mandate of bettering the conditions of Native Hawaiians,” Machado said.
No kidding. This at least is not a denial, but that is cold comfort.

Kamana‘opono Crabbe, OHA’s chief executive officer, is unworthy of the crucial, gatekeeping position; he should resign for his own egregious dereliction of duty. According to the audit, he ignored “do not fund” recommendations from staff for indefensible spending requests, thereby disregarding his fiduciary responsibilities.

As for the trustees themselves, there has never been a stronger case made for term limits. This scandal breathes life into measures such as Senate Bill 1303, calling for amendments to the OHA election process.

The expenditure examples cited in the report are a disgrace. Five years ago, trustee allowances were expanded to enable “compassionate assistance,” described as “support for beneficiaries in their personal quest for self-improvement.”

Somehow this broad language was contorted to allow sponsorships such as $1,900 for the recipient to attend a Las Vegas rodeo competition, gifts to cover medical expenses for a trustee’s family member, political contributions and more such nonsense.
Anyone who seriously believes this is how to distribute OHA funds should not be sitting at the controls.

“We fully understand that the daunting challenges our beneficiaries face — as well as our sweeping mandate — require our commitment to continuous improvement and progress,” Machado added in her statement. “We know we must do better.”

The mandate is more than to do better, it’s to do right by the beneficiaries. The board and its executive staff have utterly failed here. Those who remain, or who are not tossed out of office in November by angry constituents, will have to prove, in short order, that they can perform their responsibilities.

Even better, they should leave the job to those who can handle it responsibly.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"WHO IS SUCKING HAWAI`I DRY?"

Billions Of Dollars From Crude Oil Sales Pour Into Middle Eastern Countries Every Year.

Poverty Has Been Eradicated In Those Countries & Citizens Are Very Well Off.

Billions Of Tourist Dollars Also Pour Into Hawai`i Each Year With Very Different Results.

Watch This To See Why With All Those Billions, Itʻs Still So Hard To Make Ends Meet In Hawai`i.
 

Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

KEEP ON TRUCKINʻ
 

Monday, February 12, 2018

BE WARY OF HARRY
 

Sunday, February 11, 2018

THE STORY OF HĀLOA ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Only The People Change - A Visit With Kapa`ihi Umebayashi"

Hereʻs a story weʻve long wanted to tell you - the unique and special relationship between Hawaiians and the taro plant which goes back centuries. To do that, we spent an afternoon with Kapa`ihi Umebayashi, a farmer at Kako`o`oiwi on O`ahuʻs beautiful windward side. He explained to us taro is not just a staple food for Hawaiians, but theyʻre actually related to it. Join us in our amazing visit with Kapa`ihi as he explains the ancient ties between Hawaiians, taro and Hawai`iʻs land and what they have to teach all of us if we only listen - Watch It Here

MONDAY, February 12th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 54

MONDAY, February 12th At 5:30 PM & FRIDAY, February 16th At 4:30 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  

NEW! - Now More Na Leo O Hawai`i Air Dates -
TUESDAY, February 13th At 7:30 AM & SATURDAY, February 17th At 11:30 AMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, February 13th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, February 15th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, February 17th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52


Sneak Peek! -


"Ocean Defender - A Visit With Leilei Shih" 

Once you meet her, youʻll see she was born an activist. Both a marine geochemist and the O`ahu Sierra Clubʻs Conservation Chair, Leilei Shih is definitely a defender of the worlds oceans. But not only oceans as she also created a community farm which grows land to table fresh food for people. Join us in our amazing visit with Leilei at beautiful  Kane`ohe Bay and youʻll see why sheʻs so passionate about all things living - Watch It Here

FRIDAY, February 16th At 8:00 PM & SATURDAY, February 17th At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.
 
For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, February 10, 2018

WHATʻS THE REAL CRIME?

Friday, February 09, 2018

OHA DEMANDS FINANCIAL DETAILS FROM ITS OWN COMPANIES


Honolulu Civil Beat - February 7, 2018
 
The Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees wants several nonprofits that the agency created to hand over financial documents for an internal audit.

The trustees voted 8-0 Wednesday to require managers of the organizations to submit documents upon request, a big win for critics who have questioned why the financial details of the OHA-founded limited liability companies have remained secret.

The companies include Hiipaka LLC, which manages Waimea Valley on Oahu, and Hookele Pono LLC, which helps Native Hawaiian companies obtain government contracts. They were set up by OHA, which manages a $600 million trust and is charged with using it to benefit the indigenous Hawaiian community.

Last week, a draft state audit of the government agency found widespread financial mismanagement and no consequences for misspending.

The trustees spent an hour in executive session discussing the draft Wednesday with their legal counsel but didn’t hold a public discussion. The board is commissioning its own audit to conduct a more in-depth analysis of the agency, including the nonprofits OHA created, which are managed by the agency’s executive director.

“Isn’t it amazing that it would take a motion like that given that these are LLCs set up by the board?” said Randall Roth, a University of Hawaii law professor emeritus who specializes in trusts. “Just based on general principles and what I do know about the history of this, it’s just a sad state of affairs when the board has to formally instruct their own agents to provide information that’s absolutely essential in order for the board to carry our their legal fiduciary duties.”

Roth said the companies were reminiscent of drop-down entities that Kamehameha Schools Bishop Estate, a multi-billion-dollar private trust, created in the 1990s to hide fiscal mismanagement.

“I don’t know what’s going on here,” said Roth, giving OHA credit for demanding more transparency Wednesday. Still, “one just has to wonder how it got to the point that it’s at right now.”

Attorneys for three of the limited liability companies last year refused to give up financial documents, saying they weren’t subject to public records law.

Last year, Abigail Kawananakoa — a well known descendent of Hawaiian royalty — filed an ethics complaint against Kamana’opono Crabbe, the chief executive officer of OHA, because he didn’t disclose his affiliation with the nonprofits on his official financial disclosure.

OHA trustee Keli’i Akina leads the conservative think tank Grassroot Institute and has been an outspoken critic of the limited liability companies.

After the motion passed Wednesday, he issued a public statement saying, “Serious questions have been raised concerning the finances of OHA’s LLCs. Now that the OHA board has made it clear that the LLCs must open their books to the independent auditor, I call upon the LLCs to cooperate fully with the internal audit.”

Crabbe said after Wednesday’s meeting that the companies will cooperate with the motion but declined to comment further.

Germaine Meyers, a Native Hawaiian from Nanakuli who has been attending board meetings for the past year, said the decision is a big deal for beneficiaries like her who wonder why the companies exist and where the money is going.

“They were shut like a clam,” she said of the nonprofits.

Thursday, February 08, 2018

OHA TRUSTEES ORDER LLCs TO OPEN BOOKS FOR FORENSIC AUDIT

















The Office of Hawaiian Affairs Board of Trustees has confirmed an action requiring its LLCs to comply with information requests for its check registers.  The measure passed with eight votes.  Only Trustee Peter Apo, who had stepped out of the Board room, was absent when the vote was taken.

The independent audit is a separate endeavor from the recently completed state legislative audit of OHA.

Trustee Keli`i Akina, chair of the Audit Advisory Committee said, "Serious questions have been raised concerning the finances of OHA’s LLCs.  Now that the OHA board has made it clear that the LLCs must open their books to the independent auditor, I call upon the LLCs to cooperate fully with the internal audit.”  

Although OHA has been the subject of a recent State audit, the independent audit will cover additional territory as it examines OHA's LLCs for potential fraud, waste and abuse.

Wednesday, February 07, 2018

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"AUDIT ANGER AT OHA"

What Are They So Mad About At The Office Of Hawaiian Affairs?

Itʻs Not What You Think & Itʻs Not What They Should Be Upset About.

Instead Itʻs All About Finger Pointing & More Coverups.

Watch This To See What Theyʻre Hiding & Whatʻs Coming That Will Expose It All.

Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.

Tuesday, February 06, 2018


Monday, February 05, 2018

BECOME A FAN OF "VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`I'S FUTURE" ON FACEBOOK

See Behind The Scenes Shots Of Our Shows





    




























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Sunday, February 04, 2018

ONLY THE PEOPLE CHANGE HERE ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"


"Only The People Change - A Visit With Kapa`ihi Umebayashi"

Hereʻs a story weʻve long wanted to tell you - the unique and special relationship between Hawaiians and the taro plant which goes back centuries. To do that we spent an afternoon with Kapa`ihi Umebayashi, a farmer at Kako`o`Oiwi on O`ahuʻs beautiful windward side. He explained to us taro is not just a staple food for Hawaiians, but theyʻre actually related to it. Join us in our amazing visit with Kapa`ihi as he explains the ancient ties between Hawaiians, taro and Hawai`iʻs land and what they have to teach all of us if we only listen -
Watch It Here


MONDAY, February 5th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 54

MONDAY, February 5th At 2:00 PM & FRIDAY, February 9th At 5:30 PMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53  

NEW! - Now More Na Leo O Hawai`i Air Dates -
TUESDAY, February 6th At 11:00 AM & SATURDAY, February 10th At 8:30 AMHawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, February 6th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, February 8th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, February 10th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52

SATURDAY, February 10th  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, February 03, 2018

AND THE WINNER IS...

 

Friday, February 02, 2018

SPECTRUM DELAYED - NOT STOPPED FROM CHANNEL SLAMMING `OLELO TELEVISION
 

Please forward this to all Hawaiians and our supporters.

The fake state of Hawai`i has temporarily delayed but NOT STOPPED  Spectrumʻs plans to silence and essentially extinguish `Olelo television on O`ahu and all of itʻs community based programs.

If Spectrum is ultimately successful in doing so, all Hawaiian cultural programming on `Olelo will fall victim to their plan.

Spectrum is planning to accomplish this by doing two things -

First, relocate all `Olelo channels  into "digital Siberia," meaning high numbered channels that are hard to find and also hard to watch.

Second, to require viewers to acquire a special box to connect to your existing television.

Without this box (for which Spectrum may charge a monthly fee) you will be unable to watch `Olelo television at all.

`Olelo television is asking everyone to immediately protest this unethical and underhanded scheme to silence community programming voices.

We ask you to help stop Spectrum from implementing these changes which would be disastrous for community programming.

We have copied `Oleloʻs notice below.

Please take a few moments to read it and do your part by contacting Spectrum today to let them know you oppose these changes.


Help make sure Spectrumʻs scheme to wipe out our community voices is not just delayed but stopped completely.

Mahalo.
_______________________________________________________________

NOTICE FROM `OLELO TELEVISION

Spectrum is channel slamming ‘Ōlelo – displacing channels 49, 53, 54, and 55, including Video On Demand channels 50 and 52, into digital Siberia, or high-numbered channels that are hard to find, hard to watch, and far from the main traffic lineup.  Starting February 6, when you turn on your TV to view any of our public, education, and government programs, it won’t be there.  Instead, you’ll find our channels in the 180s.  


If you are unable to acquire a special box to connect to your existing TV, your access to the ‘Ōlelo channels will cease to exist completely. 

Spectrum’s attempt to silence community media by displacing local programming channels and imposing barriers to access these channels discriminates against community access organizations like ‘Ōlelo and community voices like YOU.  

No other local programming channels will be forced to move.  There is no legitimate reason to relocate these channels.  Spectrum can and should leave community access channels where they are – like Hawaiian Telcom, O‘ahu’s other franchised cable operator, who keeps the ‘Ōlelo channels on digital 49, 53, 54, and 55.
 

Let’s protect OUR CHANNELS, OUR MEDIA, and OUR VOICES!

TAKE ACTION NOW 

Write a letter asking Spectrum NOT to move ‘Ōlelo.  Spectrum (formerly Oceanic Time Warner Cable) is also known as Charter Communications.  Go here for Spectrum’s e-mail and U.S. mail addresses - http://olelo.org/write-a-letter-to-spectrum

Share your letter - To help ensure that all your voices and concerns are heard, please copy the State of Hawai‘i Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (DCCA) and ‘Ōlelo Community Media in your e-mail and/or U.S. mail correspondence with Spectrum.  Go here for addresses - http://olelo.org/share-your-letter


Spread the word -  We encourage you to show your support by sharing this image on social media - http://olelo.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/No-Channel-Slam-IG-with-hashtag2.jpg 


Use it as your profile picture.  Tag @spectrum on Twitter and @getspectrum on Instagram in your post.  Invite your friends and family to help out, too.  Let’s rally together to protect our channels!
 

IMMEDIATE IMPACTS

Severe Channel Confusion -  Instead of happening all at once, Spectrum’s channel change will be a piece-meal roll-out, neighborhood by neighborhood, one at a time.  


So come February 6, ‘Ōlelo channel 49 may be unchanged for Spectrum subscribers in Kaimukī, but it could be channel 182 for subscribers in Makiki.  Furthermore, Spectrum’s new channel designations are a huge shift from established ‘Ōlelo channels that Hawaiian Telcom, the other franchised cable operator on O‘ahu, continues to carry.

Forced Rebranding and Crisis Communications -  Rebranding and thoroughly communicating ‘Ōlelo channel changes by February 6 is unrealistic and impractical.  


The creation of new promotional materials, video spots, ads, etc., will be cost and time prohibitive.  In particular, ‘Ōlelo’s long-running Community Producers who continue to provide programming – many of whom are kūpuna – will face tremendous hardships to rebrand their programs to new channel numbers.
 

Spectrum’s Channel Slamming Will Spread to All Hawai‘i Community Access Organizations.  

Should ‘Ōlelo channels be forced to relocate, Spectrum’s channel slamming will occur on the neighbor islands, affecting Nā Leo on Hawai‘i County, Akakū on Maui County, and Ho‘ike on Kaua‘i County.

WHY THIS MATTERS
 

Your Right to Communicate is at Risk.  

Channel Slamming is not just a community access issue, but a communication rights issue.  Spectrum is trying to strip your access to a vital communication platform that is 100% non-commercial – a rare thing in today’s world.  Come February 6, instead of community voices at the forefront of ‘Ōlelo channels 49, 50, 52, 53, 54, and 55, Spectrum will replace these channel locations with paid programming.

Local Community Voices Matter.  


Like all other community access organizations, “localism” is a fundamental principle of ‘Ōlelo Community Media, where thousands of hours of local content is being created by our local community media producers on a weekly basis.  Because of Spectrum’s slamming of the ‘Ōlelo channels, all of these shows will be pushed from their current channel locations into inaccessible and unfamiliar ‘wilderness’ locations on short notice, and without consultation from impacted local community media producers.

Government Transparency Goes Dark.  


‘Ōlelo is a lifeline for the legislature, government agencies, and public officials, enabling them to communicate timely messages, air public hearings, and capture other government programs to inform and engage civic participation – no other local channel provides this dedicated service.  Being an election year, there is more demand for programs that increase transparency in government.  Spectrum’s slamming of ‘Ōlelo channels into digital Siberia will keep you in the dark about local issues, legislation, and policies that directly impact you and your communities.

Media Diversity is Weakened.  


The more independent communication outlets a community has, the more diversity of viewpoints presented.  The reverse is just as true.  If we let Spectrum prioritize for-profit programming over ‘Ōlelo channels, community members will no longer have a platform to amplify their voices that are within the same channel playing field as all other local and national cable networks.  Instead, community viewpoints and perspectives will be sidelined and silenced to make way for a corporate controlled media landscape.

No Room for Cable Bullies in the Aloha State. 


The removal of ‘Ōlelo channels from established locations is an example of Spectrum’s track record of cable bullying and discrimination against community media access in localities and states throughout the country.  The negative impact of these changes have been devastating for local community access centers across the nation.  

Here are a few examples -

For at least 31 of their Wisconsin systems, Charter (known as Spectrum in Hawai‘i) pushed all community access channels from their decades-long locations, channels 1-19, to 982-994. Charter is also charging government buildings and schools a $70.00 monthly fee for cable service, plus a separate cable box fee.
 

In Los Angeles County, California, community access channels are not available to local subscribers because Charter requires the city to pay for transmitting the channels.
 

In Pasadena, California, community access programming is not on Charter’s electronic program guide due to the exorbitant fees quoted by Charter to provide this service.
 

In Rochester, Massachusetts, Charter unilaterally decided to channel slam community access channels despite the local City Council’s denial of Charter’s request to do so.
 

In Montana, the existing local franchise agreement required Charter to provide a free connection to each school. Despite this, Charter informed local school districts that the switch from analog to digital would require new digital converter boxes for every TV, ultimately costing $60,000 to $100,000 a year.
 

Source: White Paper on “Charter Communications, PEG Access and Other Public Service Obligations”, September 21, 2015, Alliance for Community Media.
Disclaimer: Information related to the availability, distribution, and costs of set-top boxes is based on information received from Charter’s Customer Service Department.
 

CONTACT US

For more information about #NoChannelSlam, call (808) 237-2106 or email ‘Ōlelo’s Community Relations department.