Friday, May 27, 2022

ON JEOPARDY - MAY 24, 2022



Thursday, May 26, 2022

DIAMOND HEAD CRATER



Wednesday, May 25, 2022

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"WHY $1 MILLION FOR AN O`AHU HOME IS CHEAP"

 

Thatʻs Right,  A Million Bucks Is Cheap.

How Can We Say That?

Have You Checked Home Prices Lately On The Neighbor Islands?

Watch This Because We Did & The Answers Will Shock You.

Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.

 

Tuesday, May 24, 2022

JUST SAY NO



Monday, May 23, 2022

ITʻS UP TO YOU



Sunday, May 22, 2022

LIVING ON THE RIGHT PATH ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"

"A Life Of Humility - A Visit With Kahu Bruce Keaulani"

How do you know when you have a purpose in life thatʻs larger than you? And what do you do when you realize that purpose isnʻt just about you but involves serving all of mankind? These are some of the questions we asked Kahu Bruce in our amazing visit with him which we will long remember. Join us as Bruce Keaulani explains how he helps people to live again by putting them back on the path of light - Watch It Here

SUNDAY, May 22nd At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 54

MONDAY, May 23rd At 6:30 PM & WEDNESDAY, May 25th At 2:30 PM - Hawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53
TUESDAY, May 24th At 8:00 AM & THURSDAY, May 26th At 10:30 AM Hawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, May 24th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, May 26th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, May 28th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52

SATURDAY, May 28th  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, May 21, 2022

NATIVE HAWAIIAN URGES PEOPLE TO VACATION ELSWHERE & EXPLAINS WHY


 

MyModernMet.com - May 17, 2022

For those looking to Hawai’i for a tropical getaway, Native Hawaiian Lily Hi'ilani Okimura has a message: please don’t come. Okimura regularly posts content about the issues affecting Pacific Islanders, and one recurring topic is tourism. The islands of Hawai’i have long been tourist destinations; in 2019, a record 10.4 million people visited the islands. This decreased during the first year of the pandemic, but in 2021 the crowds returned—even though tourists were asked to vacation elsewhere.

Tourism has proven harmful to Native Hawaiians. “A lot of tourists treat our land like it's some theme park,” Okimura explains. “They will ignore warning signs, fenced-off areas, and ‘no trespassing' signs, which can cause damage to our environment like erosion, vandalism, and pollution.” This includes approaching endangered animals when it is strictly off-limits. “For example, tourists will try to go near and touch monk seals and turtles at the beach, despite having MULTIPLE signs at our beaches warning people that these are endangered species and touching them will result in them paying a fine.”

“When people say they should be able to visit Hawai'i because ‘it's part of the United States,' I tell them they're missing the point. Sure, you have the ‘right' to travel wherever you want, but does that make it right?” Okimura continues. “Especially if the Indigenous people and other residents are asking visitors not to come due to a worldwide pandemic, our limited resources, and because our tourism industry exploits our people and culture. What does that say about you to disregard all of this because ‘What about my vacation?’”

Tourism Doesn’t Benefit Most Native Hawaiians.

Those who do work in the industry are overworked and underpaid. A majority (51%) of those experiencing homelessness on the islands are natives. Instead, tourism benefits large corporations and developers that are, by and large, not from Hawai’i.

If tourists are determined to visit Hawai’i, Okimura offers some ways to minimize the harm. One way is to avoid giving money to the hotel industry and Airbnbs, which non-residents mostly own. It's best to stay with someone they know who already lives there. Another way is to experience Hawai’i beyond the typical touristy activities. Learn some of ōlelo Hawai'i (the Hawaiian language), and be sure to buy from locally-owned restaurants and businesses, particularly Native Hawaiian-owned. And finally, visitors should leave things as they found them. Pick up trash and don’t take anything from the environment like sand or rocks.

“Native Hawaiians have a deep connection to the ʻāina, the land,” Okimura shares. “We consider ourselves stewards of the land, and it is our kuleana, our responsibility, to take care of it, because in return, it takes care of us.”

 

Friday, May 20, 2022

HOW THE PANDEMIC SHOOK HAWAIIAN TOURISM










SeattleMet - March 22, 2022


Waikiki was like a ghost town in the middle of 2020. Instead of sunburned bodies sardined on the Hawaiian beach or the high-pitched squeals from tourists as their feet touched the warm ocean, there was just the sound of the wind and waves crashing on the shore.

For Starr Kalahiki, Native Hawaiian jazz singer and activist, those early quarantine days fostered healing—for both the land and the locals. “The response was immediate. The land was so, so happy,” she says from her blue-walled bedroom in Moanalua, about 10 miles northwest of Honolulu’s famous beach. “In Waikiki, you could smell the lipoa, you could smell the seaweed. You didn’t smell suntan lotion.”

Two hundred miles away, on Hawai’i Island, photographer Kapulei Flores felt the same: “It was so nice to be able to go to the beach and not have to worry about if it’s gonna be crowded. Just being able to freely walk around your own community, your own ’āina, was the best part.”

But for others, the change felt apocalyptic. Airports had no traffic; neither did the freeways. Streets weren’t flooded with people, hotels and restaurants were desolate. With tourism as the state’s biggest industry, Covid threw Hawai’i for a loop—and the islands already struggle with the effects of visitors.

A 1973 Seattle Daily Times article proclaimed the 50th state an ideal travel spot for Washingtonians: “Hawai’i is a destination that has just about everything for the vacationer, from the high-rise finery of bustling Waikiki to the quiet scenery of the neighborhood islands.”

In 2019, Hawai’i had a record year, bringing in 10.4 million tourists from around the globe—two million of those from Washington. Pre-pandemic, 170,000, on average, left Sea-Tac Airport for the islands every month. But when Covid hit, Hawai’i governor David Ige proclaimed a 14-day quarantine for all incoming travelers. The slightest violation of his restrictions would be met with a pricey fine or up to a year in prison.

For those first 10 months of 2020, total visitor arrivals in Hawai’i dropped 75 percent, from 30,000 to less than 1,000 per day. Travel from Washington to the islands declined only 35 percent to about 730,000 for the entirety of the year.

Though the pause in travel kept Hawai’i as one of the lowest Covid-infected states in the U.S., its unemployment skyrocketed, going from two percent to 20: “We went from the lowest unemployment to the highest in the whole United States in one month,” says Jerry Agrusa, travel industry management professor at the University of Hawai’i.

Then quarantine exceptions expanded, allowing visitors to bypass it with a negative test. The pre-travel testing program led to the highest number of visitors since before Covid in just the first month, and nearly half of those travelers flew out of Sea-Tac.

By the time 2021 came around, talk of a “hot-vaxxed summer” lingered in the air. Although Seattle logged record-breaking temperatures in June, nothing stopped Washingtonians from trading Golden Gardens for the North Shore.

Yet visitors cheated isolation requirements, ignored mask mandates, and even falsified vaccination cards—one forger was arrested with a fake card that read “Maderna” instead of Moderna. As delta spiked, the state saw some of the highest case numbers they’d seen all pandemic and Ige pleaded, “Now is not a good time to travel to Hawai’i.”

Covid cases and hospitalizations can be tallied and the number of tourists that entered each island can be counted, but it’s harder to determine a diminishing land. “How do you quantify ’āina that is eroding because there’s too many hikers?” says O’ahu singer Pōmaika’i Keawe. At Diamond Head State Park near Honolulu, a park coordinator counted more than 500 people on the trail one day last summer, despite Hawai’i’s social distancing measures.

In 2020, Hawai’i Tourism Authority tried to remedy the tourist problem, announcing a six-year plan that consists of reservation requirements for state parks, conservation fees, and even educational videos that spread cultural and environmental awareness. The plan hopes to change the stigma surrounding tourism and challenge visitors, giving them a more authentic experience. Agrusa thinks the real problem is there are just too many tourists.

Tourism has never been a black-and-white issue for Hawai’i. For many, the hospitality industry is their main source of income and is the main driving force for the state economy. But its effects are complicated. “Everyone equates Hawai’i with tourism,” says Agrusa, “but our real problem is housing.”

It started with short-term vacation rentals. During the 1980s, O’ahu was littered with STRs. Visitors intruded residential neighborhoods and by 1989, the island made them illegal. But in 2019, there were still an estimated 33,118 STRs statewide, and they contributed to the shortage of affordable full-time rental homes.

Some renters in Hawai’i spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing costs. Home value and property taxes continue to rise, pricing out many local residents who already struggle to stay in their homes. Still, out-of-state investors continue to buy up houses, condos, and apartments, especially in Waikiki. “We’re being uprooted for corporate foreign entities and companies who do not care about the land or the people or the effects,” says photographer Kapulei Flores.

Struggles over land are nothing new in Hawai’i, nor are how they intersect with its tourism. Mauna Kea, the globe’s largest mountain, is a premier site for astronomical observatories—and a popular visitor attraction. It is home to more telescopes than any other peak. When plans for another observatory were announced, Native Hawaiians protested the additional intrusion on a sacred space. Kia’i mauna, mountain protectors, have been protesting the installation since 2014. “We are doing our best to preserve what

we can so you can continue to come back,” says Keawe. “But you’re not going to have the same Hawai’i to come back to if you’re not helping us care for this place, and learn who we are, and why these places are important to us.”

In late 2021, locals in the state’s biggest city were dealt another blow. As tourists worried about restaurants being open for indoor dining, 93,000 people couldn’t even drink their own water—it was laced with petroleum from the nearby Navy fuel farm on O’ahu. This isn’t the first occurrence either. Since its creation in the 1940s, the well has leaked 180,000 gallons of gasoline into Hawai’i’s drinking water.

As mask mandates fell across the country, Hawai’i has remained the sole holdout with a statewide rule ending March 25. Two years into the pandemic, singer and activist Starr Kalahiki still has hope for a change in how outsiders affect life in Hawai’i; she imagines a world for both outsiders and Natives.

“What I wish is that it would be understood how sacred this place is and that it would be honored as such,” Kalahiki says, crying. “I don’t blame the world for not knowing how Hawai’i should be seen. I want to share the beauty of this place with the world, but in a safe way.”

Thursday, May 19, 2022

KAHANA, MAUI



Wednesday, May 18, 2022

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"AN OUT OF CONTROL INVASION"

Would You Believe It?

There Are Now More Tourists In Hawai`i Than Before COVID.

So What Happened To Hawai`iʻs Promise To Redesign Tourism From The Ground Up?

Watch This To See Why They Lied (Again) & What You Can Do About It.

Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.

 

Tuesday, May 17, 2022

BECOME A FAN OF "VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`I'S FUTURE" ON FACEBOOK 

See Behind The Scenes Shots Of Our Shows


 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click HERE To Become A Fan

Monday, May 16, 2022

KE AUPUNI UPDATE - MAY 2022


 

 

 


 

 

More than Platitudes...
Recent actions at the State of Hawaii Legislature indicate a positive shift in the lawmakers’ willingness to address some important issues that matter to the Hawaiian nation.

The legislature recently passed some significant legislation acknowledging the Stateʻs wrong doing and malfeasance in its handling of its trust obligations to Hawaiians and the mismanagement of the assets of the Hawaiian nation.

We’ve heard platitudes, admissions and apologies before, but this time the state appears to be “putting its money where its mouth is.” Of course the money is the stateʻs attempt to buy its way out of a sticky situation. But nevertheless, money is the medium and measure used by the occupier to indicate its level of “concern”... Hopefully, this time the funds will produce real action, with real lands being put into Hawaiiansʻ hands, and real changes in attitudes and policies toward Hawaiians.

• The legislature budgeted nearly a billion dollars to begin fixing the 60-years of the Stateʻs criminal mismanagement of its Hawaiian Home Lands trust obligations. That consists of $600 million to actually place Hawaiians on their lands, and $328 million as a settlement in restitution to those who were left dangling (and dying) for decades on the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands (DHHL) waiting list.

• The state is increasing its annual payments to operate the Office of Hawaiian Affairs from $15.1 million to $21.5 million (and an additional lump sum of $64 million for shortchanging OHA over the past 10 years), This moves the state a little closer, but still very short of its constitutionally mandated 20% (now calculated at $80 million a year) of the revenues from “Crown Lands” held in trust by the state.

Even seemingly minor legislation are significant indicators of the state’s new-found willingness to address (or placate) Hawaiian’s concerns. Here are a few examples:

• The state legislature designated that from now on, every July 31st, the first Hawaiian Kingdom holiday, Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea (Sovereignty Restoration Day) shall be a special day of observance in the State of Hawaii... Included in the legislation are directives to educate the general public about the significance of Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea.

• The state legislature issued an apology to the Hawaiian people for the 90-year ban of the Hawaiian Language from Hawaii public schools and public use, causing near extinction and immeasurable damage to ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi in the Hawaiian Islands.

• The legislature is requesting the US Postal Service to change the name of the Captain Cook post office to the original place name, Kaʻawaloa.

• The state legislature adopted a resolution to request the DLNR to change the name of the Russian Fort Elizabeth on Kauai to the original place name of Pāʻulaʻula.

• Although insider politics caused the legislature to drop the ball regarding changing the name of McKinley High School, overwhelming and irrefutable testimonies favoring the change are on the record of the legislative hearings.

• The state legislature appropriated $500,000 to continue restoration efforts of Kahoʻolawe through the fiscal year, 2022-2023.

• The state legislature passed a propodal to create a new commission for the administration and management of Mauna Kea. While this is clearly a move to continue the state’s support to build the thirty-meter telescope, it is clearly the state’s acknowledgement that they are stymied by the kūʻē of Kū Kiaʻi Mauna, Kapu Aloha and Aloha ʻĀina.

These recent actions has the Fake State of Hawaii ironically validating our national interests and adding to the momentum to Free Hawaii.

------
SIGN THIS PETITION…

Rename McKinley High School and remove the McKinley statue! He was the president who turned Hawaii from a peaceful, neutral country into a major hub of America’s war machine. Sign this online petition NOW! Tell everyone you know to sign it too! TinyURL.com/AlohaOeMcKinley

PLEASE KŌKUA…
Your kōkua, large or small, is vital to this effort...
To contribute, go to:

• GoFundMe – CAMPAIGN TO FREE HAWAII

• PayPal – use account email: info@HawaiianKingdom.net

• Other – To contribute in other ways (airline miles, travel vouchers, volunteer services, etc...) email us at: info@HawaiianKingdom.net 

“FREE HAWAII” T-SHIRTS - etc.
Check out the great FREE HAWAII products you can purchase at...
http://www.robkajiwara.com/store/c8/free_hawaii_products

All proceeds are used to help the cause. MAHALO!

Malama Pono,


Leon Siu


Hawaiian National

 

Sunday, May 15, 2022

SERVING ALL MANKIND ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"

"A Life Of Humility - A Visit With Kahu Bruce Keaulani"

How do you know when you have a purpose in life thatʻs larger than you? And what do you do when you realize that purpose isnʻt just about you but involves serving all of mankind? These are some of the questions we asked Kahu Bruce in our amazing visit with him which we will long remember. Join us as Bruce Keaulani explains how he helps people to live again by putting them back on the path of light - Watch It Here

SUNDAY, May 15th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 54

MONDAY, May 16th At 6:30 PM & WEDNESDAY, May 18th At 2:30 PM - Hawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53
TUESDAY, May 17th At 8:00 AM & THURSDAY, May 19th At 10:30 AM Hawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, May 17th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, May 19th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, May 21st At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52

FRIDAY, May 20th At 8:00 PM & SATURDAY, May 21st  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.

Saturday, May 14, 2022

RED HILL SPILL FAR WORSE THAN US NAVY LET ON


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hawaii News Now - May 13, 2022

Six months after the Navy’s tainted water crisis went public, the state has released new maps showing the underground movement of the contamination.

For the first time, the public is seeing Department of Health maps of the plume of petroleum contamination based on Navy data. It shows the plume before last year’s fuel spills, during the height of the last year’s spill and what it looks like today.

“I was shocked, speechless just to see the extent of the contamination and how severe it was was really quite startling,” said Marti Townsend, former director of the Sierra Club of Hawaii.

“The contamination in the water supply existed before November 2021, it endures now and while the intensity has decreased, it’s clear that the plume is spreading towards the west,” she added.

During a Fuel Tank Advisory Committee convened by the state Department of Health, Board of Water Supply Manager and Chief Engineer Ernie Lau said he found the maps “disturbing and concerning.”

“Generally, what I see from those is that there appears to be a westerly movement of the contaminant plume looking like it’s going to move across Halawa Valley Road, is that correct,” asked Lau.

“The data as mapped certainly indicates, especially monitoring well 12, the one outside of Red Hill Navy property, is essentially our sentinel well now and it has shown the effects that you were saying,” said Fenix Grange, who is with the Health Department’s Hazard Evaluation and Emergency Response.

The agency says the plume at the moment seems to be stable and contracting. The polluted area is no longer feeding any water system. The Navy says after flushing and filtering, it’s water is safe to drink.

“As part of 1,600 samples that we’ve taken a part of the water distribution system, none of them have had indications of JP-5 contamination within the water,” said Capt. James “Gordie” Meyer, commanding officer of NAVFAC Hawaii.

Many in the community are still upset.

“The military poisoned our water, poisoned our children and then lied about it,” said one woman, who testified at the public meeting.

There’s also frustration that the Navy refuses to release its initial internal investigation.

“I want the report from January since that one’s already been written and I don’t really care that it’s only preliminary,” said Dr. Melanie Lau, member of the Hawaii Water Advisory Committee.

The Navy had no timeline for when it will drain the fuel and shut down the Red Hill tanks.

“I don’t expect them to be measured in multiple or several years for each of those steps, but I can’t commit to a timeline now,” said Meyer.

Friday, May 13, 2022

THE FIGHT TO TAKE BACK HAWAI`I



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

READ THE ENTIRE STORY HERE - https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-05-12/native-hawaiians-fighting-for-culture-language-and-land/101051550

Thursday, May 12, 2022

TRUTH


 

Wednesday, May 11, 2022

FREE HAWAI`I TV
THE FREE HAWAI`I BROADCASTING NETWORK

 

"WHAT IS HAWAI`IʻS TICKING TIME BOMB?"

Tick, Tick, Tick, Tick.

Thereʻs A Time Bomb In Hawai`i Thatʻs Ready To Explode.

You May Have Already Seen It In Your Neighborhood.

Watch This To See What It Is & Why Youʻll Be The One To Deal With It.

Then Share This Video Today With Your Family & Everyone You Know.

 

Tuesday, May 10, 2022

SAY IT



Monday, May 09, 2022

MILILANI TRASK - "OHA REJECTS BAD MAUNA KEA BILL"



Sunday, May 08, 2022

THE FUTURE OF HEALTHY EATING ON “VOICES OF TRUTH - ONE-ON-ONE WITH HAWAI`IʻS FUTURE"

"Hawaiians At Risk - A Visit With Elise Dela Cruz-Talbert"

Weʻve all heard about the many health risks Hawaiians face, but Elise Dela Cruz-Talbert is one of those who actually wants to do something about it. Thatʻs what led her to pursuing her doctorate in epidemiology, which deals with the prevalence of disease in large populations. When we met Elise, we could immediately feel her passion for revolutionizing not only where Hawaiians get their food, but also what they eat. Donʻt miss our fascinating visit with Elise filmed in the student organic farm on the West O`ahu campus of the University of Hawai`i and youʻll see why Elise and others like her are the future of healthy eating and healthy living for everyone - Watch It Here

SUNDAY, May 8th At 6:30 PM Maui – Akaku, Channel 54

MONDAY,May 9th At 6:30 PM & WEDNESDAY, May 11th At 2:30 PM - Hawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 53
TUESDAY, May 10th At 8:00 AM & THURSDAY, May 12th At 10:30 AM Hawai`i Island – Na Leo, Channel 54

TUESDAY, May 10th At 7:30 PM, THURSDAY, May 12th At 7:30 PM & SATURDAY, May 14th At 5:30 PM Kaua`i - Ho`ike, Channel 52

SATURDAY, May 14th  At 5:30 PM O`ahu - `Olelo, Channel 53

Now you can become a fan of Voices Of Truth on Facebook by clicking Here and see behind the scenes photos of our shows and a whole lot more.  

Voices Of Truth interviews those creating a better future for Hawai`i to discover what made them go from armchair observers to active participants. We hope you'll be inspired to do the same.
 
Voices Of Truth now airs on local access stations in over 90 cities across the US and throughout the world. Check your local listings.

For news and issues that affect you, watch Free Hawai`i TV, a part of the Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network.
 
Please share our Free Hawai`i Broadcasting Network videos with friends and colleagues. That's how we grow. Mahalo.